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See also: Puri and purí

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Hindi पूरी (pūrī), a kind of pancake

NounEdit

 
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puri (countable and uncountable, plural puris)

  1. A type of unleavened bread from India and Pakistan, usually deep-fried.
    • 1831, Arnot (translator), Sandford, “Indian Cookery, as Practised and Described by the Natives of the East”, in Miscellaneous Translations from Oriental Languages[1], volume I, London: J.L. Cox, retrieved 2016-07-03, page 28:
      No. 17 PURI. Take Flour, ½ ser (1lb.)

Etymology 2Edit

From Balinese puri, from Old Javanese purī (palace, royal residence).

NounEdit

puri (plural puris)

  1. In Bali and other parts of Indonesia, a palace, or other residence of a member of the royal family or ruling class.

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *buriz (favourable wind). Cognate to Finnish purje. A Baltic origin is also possible; compare Lithuanian burė.

NounEdit

puri (genitive purje, partitive purje)

  1. sail

InflectionEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

puri

  1. Third-person singular indicative past form of purra.

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

NounEdit

puri (plural puri-puri, first-person possessive puriku, second-person possessive purimu, third-person possessive purinya)

  1. castle (fortified building)
  2. palace, royal residence

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

puri

  1. plural of puro

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

LatvianEdit

NounEdit

puri m

  1. (dialectal form) nominative plural form of purs
  2. (dialectal form) vocative plural form of purs

RomaniEdit

NounEdit

puri

  1. Alternative form of pori