resound

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

re- +‎ sound

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

resound (third-person singular simple present resounds, present participle resounding, simple past and past participle resounded)

  1. (intransitive) to sound again
  2. (transitive) to echo a sound
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English resownen, from Old French resoner, from Latin resonare (sound again, resound, echo)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

resound (third-person singular simple present resounds, present participle resounding, simple past and past participle resounded)

  1. (intransitive) to reverberate with sound or noise
    The street resounded with the noise of the children's game.
  2. (intransitive) to make a reverberating sound
    The sound of the brass band resounded through the town.
  3. (transitive) To throw back, or return, the sound of; to echo.
    • Alexander Pope
      Albion's cliffs resound the rural lay.
  4. To praise or celebrate with the voice, or the sound of instruments; to extol with sounds; to spread the fame of.
    • Alexander Pope
      The man for wisdom's various arts renowned, / Long exercised in woes, O muse, resound.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 17:42