See also: Scoop and -scoop

English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Middle English scope, schoupe, a borrowing from Middle Dutch scoep, scuep, schope, schoepe (bucket for bailing water) and Middle Dutch schoppe, scoppe, schuppe ("a scoop, shovel"; > Modern Dutch schop (spade)), from Proto-Germanic *skuppǭ, *skuppijǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kep- (to cut, to scrape, to hack).[1]

Cognate with Old Frisian skuppe (shovel), Middle Low German schōpe (scoop, shovel), German Low German Schüppe, Schüpp (shovel), German Schüppe, Schippe (shovel, spade). Related to English shovel.

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: sko͞op, IPA(key): /skuːp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːp

Noun edit

scoop (plural scoops)

  1. Any cup- or bowl-shaped tool, usually with a handle, used to lift and move loose or soft solid material.
    She kept a scoop in the dog food.
    an ice-cream scoop
  2. The amount or volume of loose or solid material held by a particular scoop.
    Use one scoop of coffee for each pot.
    I'll have one scoop of chocolate ice-cream.
  3. The act of scooping, or taking with a scoop or ladle; a motion with a scoop, as in dipping or shovelling.
    with a quick scoop, she fished the frog out of the pond.
  4. A story or fact; especially, news learned and reported before anyone else.
    Synonyms: dope, poop
    He listened carefully, in hopes of getting the scoop on the debate.
    • 1912, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World [], London, New York, N.Y.: Hodder and Stoughton, →OCLC:
      "We may get a scoop, if we are lucky. You'll be there in any case, so you'll just give us a pretty full report."
    • 2016 November 7, Peter Bradshaw, “Allied: what happens when a film gets eclipsed by gossip”, in The Guardian[1]:
      The problem is that the public, disobediently giggling over their social media accounts, reckon they’ve already got the scoop without needing to see the film.
  5. (automotive) An opening in a hood/bonnet or other body panel to admit air, usually for cooling the engine.
  6. The digging attachment on a front-end loader.
  7. A place hollowed out; a basinlike cavity; a hollow.
  8. A spoon-shaped surgical instrument, used in extracting certain substances or foreign bodies.
  9. A special spinal board used by emergency medical service staff that divides laterally to scoop up patients.
  10. A sweep; a stroke; a swoop.
  11. (Scotland) The peak of a cap.
  12. (pinball) A hole on the playfield that catches a ball, but eventually returns it to play in one way or another.
  13. (surfing) The raised end of a surfboard.
    • 1965, John M. Kelly, Surf and Sea, page 116:
      This brings the scoop into play as additional wetted surface and slows the board due to its fore-and-aft curvature
    • 1977, Fred Hemmings, Surfing: Hawaii's Gift to the World of Sports, page 59:
      [T]he scoop or upward curvature in the front or nose section of a board is designed to keep the board from diving under the surface of the water when the surfer is catching a wave.
  14. (film, television) A kind of floodlight with a reflector.
  15. (slang, dated) A haul of money made through speculation.
  16. (music) A note that begins slightly below and slides up to the target pitch.
    • 1995, Music & Computers, volume 1, numbers 2-4, page 57:
      Jazz symbols include many contoured articulations and inflections, such as doits, fall-offs, and scoops.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

scoop (third-person singular simple present scoops, present participle scooping, simple past and past participle scooped)

  1. (transitive) To lift, move, or collect with a scoop or as though with a scoop.
    He used both hands to scoop water and splash it on his face.
    • 2011 December 27, Mike Henson, “Norwich 0 - 2 Tottenham”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      Their first clear opportunity duly came courtesy of a mistake from Russell Martin, who was hustled off the ball by Bale, but the midfielder scooped his finish well over the top as he bore down on the Norwich goal.
  2. (transitive) To make hollow; to dig out.
    I tried scooping a hole in the sand with my fingers.
  3. (transitive) To report on something, especially something worthy of a news article, before (someone else).
    The paper across town scooped them on the City Hall scandal.
  4. (music, often with "up") To begin a vocal note slightly below the target pitch and then to slide up to the target pitch, especially in country music.
  5. (MTE, slang) To pick (someone) up
    You have a car. Can you come and scoop me?

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References edit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024), “scoop”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English scoop.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

scoop m (plural scoops)

  1. scoop (news learned and reported before anyone else)

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English scoop.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

scoop m (invariable)

  1. (journalism) scoop (news learned and reported before anyone else)

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit