See also: Sel, sèl, sêl, šel, -sel, and sel-

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch cel, from Middle Dutch celle, from Latin cella.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sel (plural selle)

  1. cell (element of a table)
  2. cell (basic unit of a living organism)
  3. cell (small room, especially in a jail or prison)

Derived termsEdit


CahuillaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sél

  1. flower

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

sel

  1. masculine singular past participle of sít

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

sel

  1. genitive plural of selo

AnagramsEdit


ExtremaduranEdit

VerbEdit

sel

  1. to be

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French sel, from Old French sel, from Latin sāl, salem, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sel m (plural sels)

  1. table salt, i.e. sodium chloride (NaCl)
  2. (chemistry) salt
  3. (in the plural) smelling salts

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch cel (cell), from Middle Dutch celle, from Latin cella.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɛl]
  • Hyphenation: sèl

NounEdit

sɛl (plural, first-person possessive selku, second-person possessive selmu, third-person possessive selnya)

  1. cell
    1. a small room or compartment
      1. prison cell
      2. cloister cell
    2. basic unit of a living organism
    3. the basic unit of a battery

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sel.

NounEdit

sel m (plural sels)

  1. salt

DescendantsEdit

  • French: sel

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse selr.

NounEdit

sel m (definite singular selen, indefinite plural seler, definite plural selene)

  1. a seal (marine mammal)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
 
ein sel
Photo: Donna Nook (2010)

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse selr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sel m (definite singular selen, indefinite plural selar, definite plural selane)

  1. (zoology) a seal, pinniped
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse sel n, from Proto-Germanic *salją.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sel n (definite singular selet, indefinite plural sel, definite plural sela)

  1. a seter cottage, with sleeping room(s), a kitchen and a dairy storage room
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle Low German sel (soul), as does also ultimately sjel. From Old Saxon sēola, from Proto-West Germanic *saiwalu, from Proto-Germanic *saiwalō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sel f

  1. a soul; Used only in the expression mi sel (truly!).

Etymology 4Edit

From the verb selja (to sell).

NounEdit

sel n (definite singular selet, indefinite plural sel, definite plural sela)

  1. (rare) a sale
    Synonym: sal n

VerbEdit

sel

  1. present tense of selja and selje
  2. imperative of selje and selje

Etymology 5Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sel

  1. imperative of sela and sele

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *salą, from Indo-European. Cognate with Old High German sal, German Saal (hall, large room), Old Saxon sal, Dutch zaal. Compare sele, from a Germanic variant stem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sel n

  1. room, great hall, (large) house, castle
    Heorot, sincfāge selHeorot, richly adorned hall.
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See sælig (blessed, fortunate)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sēl (comparative sēlla, superlative sēlest)

  1. good, noble
    Sōna ic wæs wyrpende and mē sēl wæs.Soon I was recovering and I was better.
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sāl, salem.

NounEdit

sel m (oblique plural seaus or seax or siaus or siax or sels, nominative singular seaus or seax or siaus or siax or sels, nominative plural sel)

  1. salt

DescendantsEdit


Old NorseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *salją, diminutive of either *salą or *saliz.

NounEdit

sel n

  1. shed on a mountain pasture
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: sel n
  • Norwegian Bokmål: sel n

ReferencesEdit

  • sel in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

NounEdit

sel

  1. indefinite accusative singular of selr (seal)

VerbEdit

sel

  1. inflection of selja (to sell):
    1. first-person singular active present indicative
    2. second-person singular active imperative

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) sal

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sāl, sālem, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls.

NounEdit

sel m

  1. (Puter) salt

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English self, silf, sulf, from Old English self, seolf, sylf, from Proto-Germanic *selbaz.

NounEdit

sel

  1. self

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *sъlъ, from the same root as sláti.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sə̏l or sə̏ł m anim

  1. messenger

InflectionEdit

Masculine anim., hard o-stem
nom. sing. sel
gen. sing. sla
singular dual plural
nominative sel sla sli
accusative sla sla sle
genitive sla slov slov
dative slu sloma slom
locative slu slih slih
instrumental slom sloma sli

Tok PisinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English sail.

NounEdit

sel

  1. sail
  2. canvas; tarpaulin
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

sel

  1. to sail

Etymology 2Edit

From English shell.

NounEdit

sel

  1. shell
  2. shellfish

Etymology 3Edit

From English cell.

NounEdit

sel

  1. cell (biology)

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ottoman Turkish سل(sel), a vulgar variant of سیل(seyl), from Arabic سَيْل(sayl).

NounEdit

sel

  1. flood

ReferencesEdit

  • Meninski, Franciszek à Mesgnien (1680) , “sel”, in Thesaurus linguarum orientalium, Turcicae, Arabicae, Persicae, praecipuas earum opes à Turcis peculiariter usurpatas continens, nimirum Lexicon Turkico-Arabico-Persicum, Vienna, column 2647
  • Meninski, Franciszek à Mesgnien (1680) , “sel”, in Thesaurus linguarum orientalium, Turcicae, Arabicae, Persicae, praecipuas earum opes à Turcis peculiariter usurpatas continens, nimirum Lexicon Turkico-Arabico-Persicum, Vienna, column 2735