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See also: sére, seré, and Sêre

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ser, sere, seare, seer, seere, seir, seyr (dry, withered; emaciated, shrivelled; brittle; bare; dead, lifeless; barren, useless),[1] from Old English sēar, sīere (dry, withered; barren; sere),[2][3] from Proto-Germanic *sauzaz (dry, parched), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂sews-, *sh₂ews- (to be dry). The English word is cognate with Dutch zoor (dry and coarse), Greek αὖος (aὖos, dry), Lithuanian sausas (dry), Middle Low German sôr (Low German soor (arid, dry)), Old Church Slavonic suχŭ (suχŭ, dry),[2] and is a doublet of sear.

AdjectiveEdit

sere (comparative serer, superlative serest)

  1. (archaic or literary, poetic) Without moisture; dry.
    Synonyms: sear; see also Thesaurus:dry
  2. (obsolete) Of fabrics: threadbare, worn out.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin serere (to link, string, join together)[3][4], ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (to bind, tie together; to thread).

NounEdit

sere (plural seres)

  1. (ecology) A natural succession of animal or plant communities in an ecosystem, especially a series of communities succeeding one another from the time a habitat is unoccupied to the point when a climax community is achieved. [from early 20th c.]
    Synonym: seral community
    • 1980 August, Douglas C. Andersen; James A. MacMahon; Michael L. Wolfe, “Herbivorous Mammals along a Montane Sere: Community Structure and Energetics”, in Journal of Mammology[1], volume 61, number 3, Baltimore, Md.: American Society of Mammalogists, ISSN 0022-2372, OCLC 1097268763, archived from the original on 21 July 2018, page 501:
      We examined one of several seres found in the middle Rocky Mountains that progress from a subalpine or montane forb-dominated meadow to a climax forest dominated by Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii).
    • 1988 December, Walter F. Mueggler, “Approach”, in Aspen Community Types of the Intermountain Region (General Technical Report; INT-250), Ogden, Ut.: Intermountain Research Station, Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture, OCLC 25967910, page 5, column 1:
      [C]ommunity types may represent either climax plant associations or successional communities within a sere.
    • 2007, Thomas J. Stohlgren, “History and Background, Baggage and Direction”, in Measuring Plant Diversity: Lessons from the Field, Oxford: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, part I (The Past and Present), page 31:
      [S]ome communities persisted as repeating early successional seres ("disclimaxes"), while climax communities could contain small areas of different sere communities.
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old French serre (modern French serre (talon)), from serrer (to grip tightly; to shut) (modern French serrer (to squeeze; to tighten)), from Vulgar Latin serrāre (to close, shut), from Late Latin serāre, present active infinitive of serō (to fasten with a bolt; to bar, bolt), from sera (bar for fastening doors), from serō (to bind or join together; entwine, interlace, interweave, plait); see further at etymology 2.[5]

NounEdit

sere (plural seres)

  1. (obsolete) A claw, a talon.

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English ser, sere, schere, seer, seere, seir, seyr, seyre (different; diverse, various; distinct, individual; parted, separated; many, several),[6] from Old Norse sér (for oneself; separately, dative reflexive pronoun, literally to oneself), from sik (oneself, myself, yourself, herself, himself; ourselves, yourselves, themselves),[7] from Proto-Germanic *sek (oneself), from Proto-Indo-European *swé (self). The English word is cognate with Danish sær (singular), især (especially, particularly), German sich (oneself; herself, himself, itself; themselves), Icelandic sig (oneself; herself, himself, itself; themselves), Latin (herself, himself, itself; themselves), Scots seir, Swedish sär (particularly).[7]

AdjectiveEdit

sere (comparative more sere, superlative most sere)

  1. (obsolete or Britain, dialectal) Individual, separate, set apart.
  2. (obsolete or Britain, dialectal) Different; diverse.

AdverbEdit

sere (comparative more sere, superlative most sere)

  1. Separately, severally.
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ sēr(e, adj.(1)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 April 2019.
  2. 2.0 2.1 sere, sear, adj.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1912.
  3. 3.0 3.1 sere” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.
  4. ^ sere, n.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986.
  5. ^ † sere, n.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1912.
  6. ^ sẹ̄r(e, adj.(2)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 April 2019.
  7. 7.0 7.1 sere, adv. and adj.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1912.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin sēra, from ellipsis of Latin sēra diēs, from sērus (late). Compare Italian sera, Venetian séra, Romansch saira, seira, Romanian seară, French soir.

NounEdit

sere f (plural seris)

  1. evening

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈseː.re], /ˈsere/
  • Hyphenation: sé‧re

NounEdit

sere f

  1. plural of sera

AnagramsEdit


KurdishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sere

  1. old

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Form of the verb serō (I sow or plant).

VerbEdit

sere

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of serō

Etymology 2Edit

Form of the verb serō (I join or weave).

VerbEdit

sere

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of serō

Etymology 3Edit

Form of sērus.

AdjectiveEdit

sēre

  1. vocative masculine singular of sērus

LeoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

VerbEdit

sere

  1. to be

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch sēro. Equivalent to sêer +‎ -e.

AdverbEdit

sêre

  1. strongly, very, to a great degree
  2. hard, forcefully
  3. fast, with speed

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • sere”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • sere”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English sēar, from Proto-Germanic *sauzaz. Doublet of sor (sorrel).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sere

  1. (especially referring to plants) dry, withered, shrunken, brittle
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French seür.

AdjectiveEdit

sere

  1. Alternative form of sure

TurkishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sere (definite accusative sereyi, plural sereler)

  1. (informal) a measure of distance, being the span, when spreading one’s fingers, from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the index finger.

ReferencesEdit

  • sere in Turkish dictionaries at Türk Dil Kurumu

ZazakiEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to Persian سر(sar).

NounEdit

sere ?

  1. (anatomy) head