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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

sal (uncountable)

  1. (chemistry, obsolete) salt
Usage notesEdit

Was used predominantly to form the names of various chemical compounds.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sal (plural sals)

  1. Shorea robusta, a dipterocarpaceous tree.
    • 1989, Thomas Weber, Hugging the trees: the story of the Chipko movement (page 18)
      As the sals were cut in the lower foothill districts the loggers looked towards the mountains in their search for other hardwood timber.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch zal.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sal (present sal, past sou)

  1. shall, will

AsturianEdit

 
Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ast

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sāl, salem.

NounEdit

sal m (plural sales)

  1. salt

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan sal, from Latin sāl, salem, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-.

NounEdit

sal f (plural sals)

  1. salt

Related termsEdit


ChairelEdit

NounEdit

sal

  1. sun

ReferencesEdit

  • W. McCulloch, Account of the Valley of Munnipore and of the Hill tribes with a comparative vocabulary of the Munnipore and other languages (1859, Calcutta: Bengal Printing Company)

ChavacanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish sal (salt).

NounEdit

sal

  1. salt

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse salr, from Proto-Germanic *saliz, from Proto-Indo-European *sol-, *sel-.

NounEdit

sal c (singular definite salen, plural indefinite sale)

  1. hall, room

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


EsperantoEdit

InterjectionEdit

sal

  1. (text messaging) Abbreviation of saluton (hello).

Franco-ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sāl, salem.

NounEdit

sal f

  1. salt

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese sal, from Latin sāl, salem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sal m

  1. salt

IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

sal

  1. indefinite accusative singular of salur
  2. indefinite dative singular of salur

IrishEdit

NounEdit

sal f (genitive singular saile) or
sal m (genitive singular sail)

  1. Alternative form of sail (dirt; stain)

DeclensionEdit

As masculine first-declension noun:

As feminine second-declension noun:

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sal shal
after an, tsal
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sāl, salem.

NounEdit

sal

  1. salt

KurdishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sal f

  1. year

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-.

Cognates include Sanskrit सलिल (salila), Old Armenian աղ (), Ancient Greek ἅλς (háls), Tocharian A sāle, and Old English sealt (English salt).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sāl m, n (genitive salis); third declension

  1. salt
    cum grānō saliswith a grain of salt
  2. wit

InflectionEdit

Third declension.
Case Singular Plural
nominative sāl salēs
genitive salis salum
dative salī salibus
accusative salem salēs
ablative sale salibus
vocative sāl salēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Middle DutchEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse salr.

NounEdit

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural saler, definite plural salene)

  1. a large room in which parties and meetings and similar are held; a hall.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse sǫðull.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural saler, definite plural salene)

  1. a saddle

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse salr.

NounEdit

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural salar, definite plural salane)

  1. a large room in which parties and meetings and similar are held; a hall
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse sǫðull.

NounEdit

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural salar, definite plural salane)

  1. a saddle

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse sal (payment).

NounEdit

sal n (definite singular salet, indefinite plural sal, definite plural sala)

  1. sale
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


NovialEdit

VerbEdit

sal (past saled, active participle salent)

  1. (auxiliary) shall, will, goes in front of a verb in order to mark it as having the future tense

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *sailą (rope). Cognate with Old Saxon sēl (Dutch zeel), Old High German seil (German Seil).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sāl m

  1. rope, cord, rein

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit


Old SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin salem, accusative of sāl.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sal f (plural sales)

  1. salt
    • c. 1250, Alfonso X, Lapidario, f. 61r.
      Et ſu ṕpriedat es de aborrecer la ſal tanto que bié parece que a entramas grand enemiztat. ca ſi las ponen en uno. quiebra la piedra ¬ mueles; ¬ la ſal pierde la ſalgadumbre que a en ella.
      And its property is that it loathes salt so much that it would seem that there is a great enmity between them both, for if they are placed together, the stone breaks, and the salt loses all the saltiness within.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

 
Saleiros com sal.

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese sal, from Latin sāl, salem (salt, wit), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l- (salt).

NounEdit

sal m (plural sais)

  1. salt (sodium chloride, a substance used as a condiment and preservative)
    Synonyms: cloreto de sódio, sal de cozinha
  2. (chemistry) salt (any compound formed from the reaction of an acid with a base)
  3. (usually in the plural) bath salt (any of several inorganic salts sometimes added to bath water)
    Synonym: sal de banho
  4. (figuratively) wit; the quality of being engaging
    Synonym: graça
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

sal m (plural sais)

  1. (rare) sal (Shorea robusta, a dipterocarpaceous tree)

RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish [Term?] (Turkish şal, from Persian شال (šāl).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sal n (plural saluri)

  1. (rare) shawl, scarf
    Synonym: șal

Etymology 2Edit

Shortened form of salut.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

sal!

  1. (informal) hey!
  2. (informal) bye!
SynonymsEdit

RomanschEdit

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es
 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Spanish sal, from Latin sāl, salem (compare Catalan sal, French sel, Italian sale, Portuguese sal, Romanian sare), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-, a root shared by English salt.

NounEdit

sal f (plural sales)

  1. salt; table salt
  2. (chemistry) salt
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

sal

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of salir.

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse salr, from Proto-Germanic *saliz, from Proto-Indo-European *sol-, *sel-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sal c

  1. a large room (for dining or meetings)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of sal 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sal salen salar salarna
Genitive sals salens salars salarnas

Related termsEdit


TurkishEdit

NounEdit

sal (definite accusative salı, plural sallar)

  1. raft

VerbEdit

sal (third-person singular simple present salar)

  1. set free!

VenetianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sāl, salem.

NounEdit

 
Venetian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia vec

sal m (plural sałi)

  1. salt (sodium chloride, non-chemical usage)

sal m (plural sali)

  1. (chemistry) salt

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

sal (plural sals)

  1. salt

DeclensionEdit