quintal

See also: Quintal

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Late Middle English, from Anglo-Norman quintal, from Middle French quintal, from Old French and Medieval Latin quintale and quintallus (various medieval hundredweights), from Arabic قِنْطَار(qinṭār, 100 rottols), from Classical Syriac ܩܰܢܛܺܝܪܳܐ(qanṭīrā) and ܩܰܢܛܺܝܢܳܪܳܐ(qanṭīnārā), from Byzantine Greek κεντηνάριον (kentēnárion), from Latin centēnārium (100 Roman pounds), from centēnārius (having 100 things) + -ium (-ium: forming abstract nouns). Use for various non-English units, borrowed from French quintal, Spanish quintal, Portuguese quintal, &c. The apparent relation to quint- (five, fivefold) and -al (forming adjectives) is accidental, although it possibly influenced the eventual spelling of the term. Doublet of centenary and kantar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

quintal (plural quintals)

  1. (historical) Synonym of hundredweight, 100 or 112 English or American pounds.
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, page 204:
      In one import license alone, the merchant in question was instructed to bring in 13,000 quintals of alum, which, snapped up by industries in England and the Low Countries, would yield the king a cool £8,666 13s 4d.
  2. (historical) Various other similar units of weight in other systems.
  3. An unofficial metric unit equal to 100 kg.

Usage notesEdit

Historically, the value varied with local values of pounds by time, location, and substance. At the time of metricization, the French quintal was 49.951 kg, the Portuguese quintal was 58.75 kg, the Spanish quintal was 46.014 kg, and the Milanese quintal was 32.67 kg. The present metric quintal is not officially recognized as part of the metric system.

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French quintal, from Medieval Latin quintāle (various medieval hundredweights), from Arabic قِنْطَار(qinṭār, 100 rottols), from Classical Syriac ܩܰܢܛܺܝܪܳܐ(qanṭīrā) and ܩܰܢܛܺܝܢܳܪܳܐ(qanṭīnārā), from Byzantine Greek κεντηνάριον (kentēnárion), from Latin centēnārium (100 Roman pounds), from centeni (100 things) + -ārius (-ary: forming related adjectives). Doublet of centenaire.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɛ̃.tal/
  • (file)

NounEdit

quintal m (plural quintaux)

  1. quintal, a nonstandard metric unit of mass equivalent to exactly 100 kg
  2. (historical) quintal, French hundredweight, a traditional unit of mass equivalent to about 49.95 kg

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French quintal, from Medieval Latin quintāle (various medieval hundredweights), from Arabic قِنْطَار(qinṭār, 100 rottols), from Classical Syriac ܩܰܢܛܺܝܪܳܐ(qanṭīrā) and ܩܰܢܛܺܝܢܳܪܳܐ(qanṭīnārā), from Byzantine Greek κεντηνάριον (kentēnárion), from Latin centēnārium (100 Roman pounds), from centeni (100 things) + -ārius (-ary: forming related adjectives).

NounEdit

quintal m (plural quintaulx)

  1. (historical) quintal, French hundredweight, a traditional unit of mass

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin quintāle (various medieval hundredweights), from Arabic قِنْطَار(qinṭār, 100 rottols), from Classical Syriac ܩܰܢܛܺܝܪܳܐ(qanṭīrā) and ܩܰܢܛܺܝܢܳܪܳܐ(qanṭīnārā), from Byzantine Greek κεντηνάριον (kentēnárion), from Latin centēnārium (100 Roman pounds), from centeni (100 things) + -ārius (-ary: forming related adjectives).

NounEdit

quintal m (oblique plural quintaus or quintax or quintals, nominative singular quintaus or quintax or quintals, nominative plural quintal)

  1. (historical) quintal, French hundredweight, a traditional unit of mass

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: (Portugal) -al, (Brazil) -aw
  • Hyphenation: quin‧tal

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese quintãal, from Vulgar Latin *quintanale; or from quinta +‎ -al.

NounEdit

quintal m (plural quintais)

  1. yard (land around a house)

Etymology 2Edit

From Medieval Latin quintāle (various medieval hundredweights), from Andalusian Arabic and Arabic قِنْطَار(qinṭār, 100 rottols), from Classical Syriac ܩܰܢܛܺܝܪܳܐ(qanṭīrā) and ܩܰܢܛܺܝܢܳܪܳܐ(qanṭīnārā), from Byzantine Greek κεντηνάριον (kentēnárion), from Latin centēnārium (100 Roman pounds). Doublet of centenário.

NounEdit

quintal m (plural quintais)

  1. quintal, a nonstandard unit of mass equal to 100 kg
  2. (historical) quintal, Portuguese hundredweight, a traditional unit of mass usually equivalent to 58.7 kg
SynonymsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
Derived termsEdit

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • qq (abbreviation)

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin quintāle (various medieval hundredweights), from Andalusian Arabic and Arabic قِنْطَار(qinṭār, 100 rottols), from Classical Syriac ܩܰܢܛܺܝܪܳܐ(qanṭīrā) and ܩܰܢܛܺܝܢܳܪܳܐ(qanṭīnārā), from Byzantine Greek κεντηνάριον (kentēnárion), from Latin centēnārium (100 Roman pounds), from centeni (100 things) + -ārius (-ary: forming related adjectives). Doublet of centenario.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kinˈtal/ [kĩn̪ˈt̪al]
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Hyphenation: quin‧tal

NounEdit

quintal m (plural quintales)

  1. quintal, an unofficial metric unit of mass equal to exactly 100 kg
  2. (chiefly historical) quintal, Spanish hundredweight, a traditional unit of mass equivalent to about 46 kg

Usage notesEdit

Historically, the quintal varied by region, over time, and depending on the object being measured.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Zoogocho Zapotec: quintal

Further readingEdit


Zoogocho ZapotecEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish quintal.

NounEdit

quintal

  1. hundredweight

ReferencesEdit

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[1] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 286