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See also: Stile, stilé, stilè, and stíle

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EnglishEdit

 
A stile over a stone wall.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English stile, style, stiȝele, from Old English stiġel (stile, set of steps for getting over a fence), from Proto-Germanic *stigilō (entry, entrance, overpass, device for climbing, stile), equivalent to sty (to ascend, climb) +‎ -le. Cognate with Dutch stijl (stile), Dutch stegel (stirrup), Low German Stegel (stile), German Stiegel (stile).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stile (plural stiles)

  1. A set of one or more steps surmounting a fence or wall, or a narrow gate or contrived passage through a fence or wall, which in either case allows people but not livestock to pass.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      'Twas very true what Greening said; for of a summer evening I would take the path that led up Weatherbeech Hill, behind the Manor; both because 'twas a walk that had a good prospect in itself, and also a sweet charm for me, namely, the hope of seeing Grace Maskew. And there I often sat upon the stile that ends the path and opens on the down, and watched the old half-ruined house below; and sometimes saw white-frocked Gracie walking on the terrace in the evening sun, and sometimes in returning passed her window near enough to wave a greeting.
  2. A vertical component of a panel or frame, such as that of a door, window or ladder.
  3. A pin set on the face of a dial, to cast a shadow; a style.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Moxon to this entry?)
  4. (obsolete) A mode of composition; a style.
    • Bunyan
      May I not write in such a stile as this?

HolonymsEdit

  • (vertical component of a panel or frame): leaf

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

stile (third-person singular simple present stiles, present participle stiling, simple past and past participle stiled)

  1. Obsolete form of style.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French style.

NounEdit

stile m (plural stili)

  1. style
  2. class

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

stile

  1. vocative singular of stilus

Lower SorbianEdit

NounEdit

stile

  1. nominative and accusative plural of stil

Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

stile m (plural stiles)

  1. style
    • 1595, Michel de Montaigne, Essais:
      Si est ce, que les vieils du Senat, memoratifs des moeurs de leurs peres, accuserent cette pratique comme ennemie de leur stile antien
      It is that the older members of the Senate, remembering the customs on their fathers, accused this practice of being the enemy of their ancient style

DescendantsEdit