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See also: Toon, tōon, and to-on

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Abbreviation of cartoon.

NounEdit

toon (plural toons)

  1. (informal) A cartoon, especially an animated television show.
    • 2005, Sara Bell, The Magic in Your Touch, →ISBN, page 123:
      Did you know Nash had a complete break with reality, that he was loonier than a toon for almost four months?
  2. (informal, video games) A player's avatar or visible character in a massively multiplayer online role-playing game.
    • 2010, Ben Kei Daniel, Handbook of Research on Methods and Techniques for Studying Virtual Communities, →ISBN:
      Proxemics are very important, however, as the positioning of an agent's toon in anon-combat grouping or in the environment can show place within a social group.
  3. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (informal, by extension) Only used in loony toon or looney toon: A person whose actions are not predictable, as they are not based on reason.
    • 1993, Llamas - Volume 7, page 98:
      We are both kind of strange and one day we were driving in the car and Steve said to me, You know Karin, you are a real loony toon'.
    • 2012, Kelly Watts, From the Mouth of Charlie Watts, →ISBN, page 32:
      I look at him as if he's a loony toon.
    • 2012, Vaughan Rapatahana, Philosophical (a)Musings, →ISBN, page 25:
      Wilson, quite early on, points out: “Many messiahs have undoubtedly been mental cases, suffering from psychotic delusions” These looney-toon 'messiahs' seem to this reviewer to be running very fast away from any profound development in human consciousness!
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Hindi तून (tūn), from Sanskrit तुणि (tuṇi, Cedrela toona).

NounEdit

toon (countable and uncountable, plural toons)

  1. A southeast Asian and Australian tree (Toona ciliata or Toona australis) of the mahogany family with fragrant dark red wood and flowers that yield a dye.
    • 1973, Gerald A. Walters & ‎Herbert L. Wick, Coppicing to convert cull Australian toon, tropical ash to acceptable trees:
      Each plot held 10 cull trees so that 60 Australian toon and 40 tropical ash trees were treated.
  2. The wood of this tree.
    • 1972, Roger G. Skolmen, Paintability of four woods in Hawaii, page 1:
      After 7 years, all paint combinations except the self-primed latex are showing some failure on all species of wood except Australian toon.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Dialectal variant of town.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

toon (plural toons)

  1. (Geordie) A town.
    • 1865, George MacDonald, Alec Forbes of Howglen - Volume 2, page 244:
      Whan I was a callan, I took the play to mysel' for a week, or maybe twa, and gaed wi' a frien' i' the same trade's mysel', to see what was to be seen alang a screed o' the seacoast, frae toon to toon.
    • 1881, B.C., “The Chestnut Tree”, in The Border Counties' Magazine - Volumes 1-2, number 201:
      Sic changes owre oor toon hae passed Since Mungo placed thee there — A wee bit slender fragile stem, That needed watchfu' care.
    • 2011, Wulf Kurtoglu & ‎Caroline Macafee, Braken Fences, →ISBN, page 43:
      It tane Bill three month fae the time he pairtit wi Beatrice tae get tae the toon o Shanzi. He stuid on a crest as the sin rase, an saw the fortress toon on the neist ridge, a silhouette lichtenin gradually intae ugly breezeblock buildins.
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

toon (plural toons)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of tune
    • 1872, David Ross Locke, The Struggles (social, Financial and Political) of Petroleum V. Nasby, page 556:
      But why dress me in bloo? Why not in gray, ef I play Confedrit toons?
    • 1876, Eneas Sweetland Dallas -, Once a Week, page 45:
      Hark at the way them wires plays toons, as if all the imps of wickedness, and—never mind where—was fiddling dismal toons on purpose to drive a man out of his wits, or to scare him so that he couldn't do his work.
    • 2013, Joseph Connolly, S.O.S., →ISBN:
      Why suddenly you're so eager to know the toon, now, Dwight? Before you was saying you didn't even hear no toon.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch teen, from Middle Dutch têe, from Old Dutch *tēa, from Proto-Germanic *taihwǭ. The vocalism -oo- is also present in some Dutch dialects in Utrecht and Holland, but seems unclear. The -n was originally a plural ending that was reanalysed as a singular form.

NounEdit

toon (plural tone, diminutive toontjie)

  1. toe (part of the foot)

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch toon, ultimately from Latin tonus.

NounEdit

toon (plural tone)

  1. tone, pitch

Etymology 3Edit

From Dutch tonen, from Middle Dutch tônen, from Old Dutch *tōnen.

VerbEdit

toon (present toon, present participle tonende, past participle getoon)

  1. (transitive) to show, to demonstrate

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch toon, ultimately from Latin tonus.

NounEdit

toon m (plural tonen, diminutive toontje n)

  1. tone
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

toon m (plural tonen, diminutive toontje n)

  1. (dialectal) Dated form of teen (toe).
  2. (archaic) The front portion of a hoof.
Usage notesEdit

Still used in some dialects in Utrecht and Holland in the meaning “toe”. This variant seems to have been quite common in Hollandic dialects until the 19th century. Similar forms have also been found to exist in certain West Frisian and Dutch Low Saxon dialects.

Etymology 3Edit

See etymology on the main entry.

VerbEdit

toon

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tonen
  2. imperative of tonen

AnagramsEdit


SomaliEdit

NounEdit

toon m

  1. garlic

Yucatec MayaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

toon (plural toonoʼob)

  1. (anatomy) penis

SynonymsEdit