See also: UG, Ug, and .ug

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ʌɡ/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ugge, from Old Norse uggr (fear, apprehension, dread), related to Old Norse ógn (terror, threat, dispute) and agi (terror, strife, fear, punishment). More at awe.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ug (plural ugs)

  1. (Northern England and Scotland, obsolete) A feeling of fear, horror or disgust.
    He took an ug at's meht.
  2. (Northern England and Scotland, obsolete) An object of disgust.
    What an ug ye've myed yorsel.
  3. (Northern England and Scotland, obsolete) Vomited matter.
  4. (Northumbria) A surfeit.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English uggen, from Old Norse ugga (to fear), see above.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

ug (third-person singular simple present ugs, present participle ugging, simple past and past participle ugged)

  1. (Northern England and Scotland, obsolete) To dread, loathe or disgust.
    • 1822, Wilson, Robert, “Answer to an Epistle from a Friend”, in Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect, page 71:
      Wha weds a cankert thriftless wife, / Weds to his days eternal strife, / For, like the Tron-Kirk bell, / She ever hammers on his lugs, / Till her an' hame at last he uggs / As the dire door o' hell!
  2. (Northern England and Scotland, obsolete) To fear, be horrified; shudder with horror.
  3. (Northern England and Scotland, obsolete) To vomit.
  4. (Northumbria, obsolete) To give a surfeit to.
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Derived from the similarity between the letter u and the Greek letter µ.

SymbolEdit

ug

  1. Alternative spelling of µg

Etymology 4Edit

 
The ugs (circled) of a koi carp.

From Icelandic uggi (fin).

NounEdit

ug (plural ugs)

  1. (Caithness, Scotland) The pectoral fin of a fish.
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CebuanoEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ug

  1. and

Waray-WarayEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ug

  1. and