See also: Yon, yön, yọn, þon, and -yon

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English yon, from Old English ġeon, from Proto-Germanic *jainaz.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

yon (not comparable)

  1. (dated or dialectal) distant, but within sight; (that thing) just over there.
    He went to climb yon hill.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book IV”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      Read thy lot in yon celestial sign.
    • 1856, Herman Melville, The Lightning Rod Man:
      " [] Yet first let me close yonder shutters; the slanting rain is beating through the sash. I will bar up." "Are you mad? Know you not that yon iron bar is a swift conductor? Desist."
    • 1918, Norman Lindsay, The Magic Pudding, Sydney: Angus and Robertson, page 158:
      "Do my eyes deceive me, or is yon object a Puddin'?" he cried.
    • 2012 Spring, Gerda Stevenson, “Federer versus Murray”, in Salmagundi:
      His head... his head... his face... it wisnae there. Nae black curly hair, nae eyes - I've never seen eyes sae blue as Joe's. Irises blue as yon sky. Blown tae smithereens... his gorgeous, bonny head, no there.
Translations edit

Adverb edit

yon (not comparable)

  1. (dated or dialectal) yonder.
Derived terms edit

Pronoun edit

yon

  1. (dated or dialectal) That one or those over there.
    • 1828, James Hogg, Mary Burnet:
      As soon as old Andrew came home, his wife and he, as was natural, instantly began to converse on the events of the preceding night; and in the course of their conversation Andrew said, "Gudeness be about us' Jean, was not yon an awfu' speech o' our bairn's to young Jock Allanson last night?"

Etymology 2 edit

Phrase edit

yon

  1. (knitting) Acronym of yarn over needle.
    • 2006, Heather Dixon, Not Your Mama's Knitting, page 222:
      Buttonhole row: (K1, p1) 3 times, yon, k2tog, (k1,p1) 5 times, yon, k2tog, []

Anagrams edit

Haitian Creole edit

Etymology edit

Maybe a contraction of French il y a un.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

yon

  1. a, an; the indefinite article

Usage notes edit

Yon always precedes the noun it modifies, unlike most adjectives.

Related terms edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

yon

  1. Rōmaji transcription of よん

Kok-Paponk edit

Pronoun edit

yon

  1. you; second-person singular pronoun

References edit

  • Paul Black (2008), “Pronominal Accretions in Pama-Nyungan”, in Claire Bowern; Bethwyn Evans; Luisa Miceli, editors, Morphology and Language History, →ISBN

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old English ġeon, from Proto-West Germanic *jain, from Proto-Germanic *jainaz.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /jɔn/, /jɛn/
  • (from inflected forms) IPA(key): /jɔːn/, /jɛːn/

Determiner edit

yon (plural and weak singular yone)

  1. (somewhat uncommon) that (over there), yon

Descendants edit

  • English: yon
  • Scots: yon, thon

Adverb edit

yon

  1. (rare) that (over there), yonder
  2. (rare) afterwards, next (chronologically)

Descendants edit

References edit

Pronoun edit

yon

  1. (rare) that one; that person

Descendants edit

References edit

Scots edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English yon, from Old English ġeon, from Proto-Germanic *jainaz. Compare English yon and German jener.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [jon]
  • (North Northern Scots, Orcadian) IPA(key): [jɪn]
  • (Shetlandic) IPA(key): [jʌn]

Adjective edit

yon (not comparable)

  1. that, those, yonder (indicating a person or thing at some distance in time or space usually more remote than that)

Pronoun edit

yon

  1. that one person or thing, etc.
  2. those

Adverb edit

yon (not comparable)

  1. yonder, over there, further away
  2. thither, to that place

Derived terms edit

Tatar edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *juŋ. Compare Kazakh жүн (jün, wool, fur, feather).

Noun edit

yon

  1. feather

Ternate edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

yon

  1. a kind of dance

References edit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh