Translingual edit

Symbol edit

yo

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Yoruba.

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /jəʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • (US) IPA(key): /joʊ/
  • (file)

Etymology 1 edit

As a greeting first attested in 1859, attested first as a cry of sailors and huntsmen (first attested in the 1400s; compare e.g. huzzah, giddyup). Originally from Middle English yo, io, ȝo, yeo, yaw, variant forms of ya, ye (yes, yea), from Old English ġēa (yes, yea), from Proto-Germanic *ja (yes, thus, so), from Proto-Indo-European *yē (already); or perhaps from Old English ēow (Wo!, Alas!, interjection). Compare Danish, Swedish, German, Norwegian jo (yes (flexible meaning)), Dutch jow (hi, hey) and Dutch jo (hi, hey). More at yea, ow, ew.

Modern popularity apparently dates from World War II (claimed to be a common response at roll calls; see definition 4), and then most intensely attested in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; it thence spread globally from American dominance of pop culture post-WWII.

Interjection edit

yo

  1. (slang) A greeting similar to hi.
    Synonyms: oi, wotcher
    Yo Paulie! How's it going?
  2. (slang) An interjection similar to hey.
    Synonyms: ahoy, oi; see also Thesaurus:hey
    Yo, check this out!
    Check this out, yo!
  3. (slang) An expression of surprise or excitement.
    Yo, that's crazy, but I don't remember asking.
    • 2021 October 2, Mason Cannon, “Don't Feel Pressured To Declare Your Major Right Away”, in Study Breaks[1]:
      I have quickly acclimated myself to the standard form of greeting on campus: "Oh hey what’s your name? … Yeah, nice to meet you, what're you studying? … Yo that’s sick!" A script to recite, nearly verbatim, 10 times a day or more.
  4. (military slang) Present! Here!
    Sergeant: Smith?
    Private Smith: Yo!
  5. (chiefly African-American Vernacular) Emphatic conclusion to a statement.
    • 2010, "Kafkaesque" (Breaking Bad TV series, season 3, episode 9)
      JESSE: That is messed up, yo.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From you're, your, etc.

Alternative forms edit

Determiner edit

yo

  1. (colloquial) Pronunciation spelling of your.
    Yo sandwich has only bacon in it. Want some ketchup on that?
Derived terms edit

Pronoun edit

yo

  1. (Baltimore) third-person singular, familiar
    Yo was tuckin' in his shirt! (Stotko and Troyer 2007)

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

yo

  1. Abbreviation of year(s) old; also y.o., y/o.
  2. (crochet) Initialism of yarn over.

Etymology 4 edit

From Russian ё (jo).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

yo (plural yos)

  1. The letter Ё, ё.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 5 edit

Numeral edit

yo

  1. Short for yoleven.

Etymology 6 edit

From irregular romanization of the standard Mandarin pronunciation of Chinese (yuè).

Noun edit

yo (plural yo or yos)

  1. Obsolete form of yue, a traditional Chinese unit of volume.

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Afar edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

  1. I, me

Usage notes edit

  • The form yóo is used when the pronoun isn't followed by a clitic.

See also edit

References edit

  • E. M. Parker; R. J. Hayward (1985), “yo”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN

Aragonese edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Late Latin eo, from Classical Latin egō̆.

Pronoun edit

yo m sg or f sg

  1. First-person singular nominative pronoun; I

See also edit

References edit

  • yo”, in Aragonario, diccionario castellano–aragonés (in Spanish)

Asturian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Late Latin eo, from Classical Latin egō̆.

Pronoun edit

yo

  1. I (first-person singular pronoun)

Chavacano edit

Etymology edit

From Spanish yo.

Pronoun edit

yo (accusative conmigo)

  1. I (first-person singular pronoun)

Chinese edit

Etymology edit

From English yo.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

yo

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, chiefly university slang) outgoing; sociable

Verb edit

yo (Hong Kong Cantonese, chiefly university slang)

  1. to act in an outgoing manner
  2. to socialize with; to interact with
  3. (euphemistic) Used in certain interjections to replace vulgar verbs.

Derived terms edit

Danish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English yo.

Interjection edit

yo

  1. (slang) yo

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English yo.

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

yo

  1. (slang) yo (informal greeting, interjection similar to hey)

Guerrero Amuzgo edit

Adjective edit

yo

  1. with

Haitian Creole edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

yo pl

  1. the

Usage notes edit

This word is only used in its article sense when it modifies a plural noun.

See also edit

Pronoun edit

yo (contracted form y)

  1. they
  2. them

Indonesian edit

  A user suggests that this Indonesian entry be cleaned up, giving the reason: “two etymologies for one interjection, plus a bonus template error”.
Please see the discussion on Requests for cleanup(+) or the talk page for more information and remove this template after the problem has been dealt with.

Etymology 1 edit

A shortening of "ayo" (come on)

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English yo.

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

yo

  1. (slang) yo (greeting, interjection similar to hey)

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

yo

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Kristang edit

Pronoun edit

yo

  1. I (first-person singular personal pronoun)[1]

See also edit

Kristang personal pronouns (edit)
Person Singular Plural
First yo nus
Second bos bolotu
Third eli olotu

References edit

  1. ^ 2010, Ladislav Prištic, Kristang - Crioulo de Base Portuguesa, Masaryk University, page 26.

Ladino edit

Etymology edit

From Old Spanish yo, from Late Latin eo, from Classical Latin egō̆.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

yo (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling ייו)

  1. I

Lashi edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Lolo-Burmese *hja, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *hja. Cognates include Jingpho yi.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

yo

  1. field
  2. farm

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

yo

  1. peace

Etymology 3 edit

From Proto-Lolo-Burmese [Term?], from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *g-ja. Cognates include Jingpho kăya.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

yo

  1. itch

References edit

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[2], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis), pages 15-16

Lingala edit

Pronoun edit

yo

  1. Alternative form of yɔ̂

Lower Tanana edit

Noun edit

yo

  1. sky

References edit

  • James Kari, Lower Tanana Athabaskan Listening and Writing Exercises (1991)

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

yo (yo5yo0, Zhuyin ˙ㄧㄛ)

  1. Hanyu Pinyin reading of
  2. Hanyu Pinyin reading of 𪠸, 𪠸

yo

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronoun edit

yo

  1. Alternative form of yow

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

yo

  1. Alternative form of heo (she)

Noone edit

Noun edit

yo (plural yɔ́)

  1. snake

References edit

Norman edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French yaue, ewe, euwe, egua (water), from Latin aqua (water), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ekʷeh₂ (water, flowing water).

Noun edit

yo f (plural yos)

  1. (Sark) water

Old Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Late Latin eo, from Classical Latin egō̆.

Adverb edit

yo

  1. I

Descendants edit

  • Ladino: yo/ייו
  • Spanish: yo
    • Chavacano: yo
    • Interlingue: yo

Pali edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronoun edit

yo

  1. masculine nominative singular of ya (who (relative))

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Spanish yo, from Late Latin eo, from Classical Latin egō̆.

Pronunciation edit

 
  • IPA(key): (everywhere but Argentina and Uruguay) /ˈʝo/ [ˈɟ͡ʝo]
  • IPA(key): (Buenos Aires and environs) /ˈʃo/ [ˈʃo]
  • IPA(key): (elsewhere in Argentina and Uruguay) /ˈʒo/ [ˈʒo]

  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -o
  • Syllabification: yo

Pronoun edit

yo

  1. First-person singular pronoun in the nominative case; I

Usage notes edit

  • When more pronouns are included in the same sentence, it is considered impolite to say the pronoun yo at first; it must be the last one (this also applies to ):
    Iremos Rosa, tú y yo.Rosa, you and I will go.

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Noun edit

yo m (plural yos or yoes)

  1. (psychoanalysis) Freud's concept of the ego

Descendants edit

  • Chavacano: yo
  • Interlingue: yo

Further reading edit

Turkish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Clipping of yok.

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

yo

  1. (informal) no
  2. (informal) Term of objection, roughly equivalent to nope, nah or naw.

Further reading edit

West Makian edit

Pronunciation edit

Particle edit

yo

  1. sentence-final action negation particle; not
    de tifiam yoI am not eating

Usage notes edit

Specifically negates action verbs (intransitive, transitive, ditransitive, etc.). To negate a stative verb, see wayo. The verbs seba/tope (to want) are not negated by ua, which would be ungrammatical. Instead, one uses the verb fono (to not want).

References edit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[3], Pacific linguistics

Xhosa edit

Pronoun edit

-yo

  1. Combining stem of yona.

Yanomamö edit

Noun edit

yo (plural yoku)

  1. path, trail, a path marked by hand-broken branches

References edit

  • Lizot, Jacques (2004) Diccionario enciclopédico de la lengua yãnomãmɨ (in Spanish), Vicariato apostólico de Puerto Ayacucho, →ISBN

Ye'kwana edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

yo

  1. (transitive) to leave (someone) without a portion from the hunt

References edit

  • Cáceres, Natalia (2011), “yo”, in Grammaire Fonctionnelle-Typologique du Ye’kwana, Lyon

Yoruba edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. to become saturated with food or drinks; to become full (after eating)
    1. to become drunk
  2. to become fleshy or robust (in reference to the belly or body)
  3. (idiomatic, euphemistic) to become pregnant

Derived terms edit

  • Àwòyó (a nickname for the orisha Yemọja)

Zulu edit

Pronoun edit

-yo

  1. Combining stem of yona.