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EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

a' (not comparable)

  1. Alternative spelling of a (all). [First attested from 1350 to 1470.]

AdjectiveEdit

a' (not comparable)

  1. Alternative spelling of a (all). [First attested from 1350 to 1470.]

BambaraEdit

PronounEdit

a'

  1. you

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

ContractionEdit

a'

  1. Truncated form of of ai

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

DeterminerEdit

a'

  1. all

AdverbEdit

a' (not comparable)

  1. All.
    • 1825, Allan Cunningham, compiler, “Who’s at My Window”, in The Songs of Scotland, Ancient and Modern; [] In Four Volumes, volume III, London: Printed for John Taylor, [], OCLC 847583, page 334:
      There’s mirth in the barn and the ha’, the ha’, / There’s mirth in the barn and the ha’: / There's quaffing and laughing, / And dancing and daffing; / And our young bride’s daftest of a’, of a’, / And our young bride’s daftest of a’.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1852–1859, Lady John Scott (lyrics and music), “Annie Laurie”, in Scottish Songs[1]:
      / Like dew on the gowan lying / Is the fa' o' her fairy feet; / And like winds in summer sighing, / Her voice is low and sweet— / Her voice is low and sweet, / And she's a' the world to me, / And for bonnie Annie Laurie / I'd lay me doon and dee.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

a' (uncountable)

  1. all

Scottish GaelicEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Contraction of an.

ArticleEdit

a'

  1. the
Usage notesEdit
  • This form is used in the singular nominative before feminine nouns beginning with b, c, g, m and p, which it lenites.
  • This form is used in the singular dative before both masculine and feminine nouns beginning with b, c, g, m and p, which it lenites.
  • This form is used in the singular genitive before masculine nouns beginning with b, c, g, m and p, which it lenites.
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Contraction of ag, and ultimately of aig

ParticleEdit

a'

  1. Used before the verbal noun.
    Tha Seoc a' fuireach ann an Glaschu. - Jock lives in Glasgow.
    Dè tha thu a' leughadh? - What are you reading?

Usage notesEdit

  • This form is used before consonants; the form used before vowels is ag (the only exception being ag ràdh - saying).
  • In the Lewis dialect, ri is used instead.
  • Scottish Gaelic has no simple present tense of regular verbs, so that constructions with a', ag or ri are used for both simple and progressive present tenses in English.

TarantinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Blend of a +‎ 'a

PrepositionEdit

a'

  1. at the

YagariaEdit

NounEdit

a'

  1. (Hua dialectal) woman

ReferencesEdit

  • John Haiman, Hua, a Papuan Language of the Eastern Highlands of New Guinea