English edit

 
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Etymology 1 edit

mid-1400s Old Frankish (replacing English la).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɑː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː

Interjection edit

ah

  1. An expression of relief, relaxation, comfort, confusion, understanding, wonder, awe, etc. according to uttered inflection.
    Ah, I understand now.
    Ah! It's good to be back home!
    Ah, the flowers of spring.
  2. A syllable used to fill space, particularly in music.
    • 2008, Britney Spears (lyrics and music), “Womanizer”:
      Boy don't try to front, uh, I
      Know just, just, what you are, ah, ah.
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Translations edit

Noun edit

ah (plural ahs)

  1. An instance of the interjection ah.
    the crowd's oohs and ahs at the fireworks

Verb edit

ah (third-person singular simple present ahs, present participle ahing, simple past and past participle ahed)

  1. To give a cry of "ah".
    • 2005, T. R. Rhoads, Sinner, Sailor: A Memoir, page 221:
      Mother and dad oohed and ahed over Cindy. She was only two months old but already was developing her personality.

Pronoun edit

ah (personal pronoun, plural we, possessive adjective mah)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of I, most often indicating that the speaker is using a Scottish or American (particularly Southern) accent.

Etymology 2 edit

From Hokkien (--a), Teochew (a7), Mandarin (a).

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Particle edit

ah (Manglish, Singlish)

  1. Marks a tag question prompting the listener to clarify something.
    You're dyslexic ah?So you're dyslexic?
    • 2020 April 12, Notdumb, “Liddat is safe distance ah?”, in SG Talk[1], archived from the original on 18 April 2020:
      Only 2 ft apart considered safe ah?
  2. Used for emphasis; reinforces a short wh-question.
    • 2011 October 23, Rachel Chang, “LifeStyle”, in The Sunday Times, page 15:
      See how lor. Who’s going ar?
  3. Emphasizes the need for absolute confirmation or acknowledgment.
    Don't drink and drive ah...
  4. A filler word used to ascertain the continued attention of the listener.

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Afar edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

áh

  1. this, these (masculine)

Declension edit

Declension of áh
absolutive áh
predicative áha
subjective áh
genitive ahtí
Postpositioned forms
l-case áhal
k-case áhak
t-case áhat
h-case áhah

See also edit

References edit

  • E. M. Parker; R. J. Hayward (1985), “ah”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[3], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Albanian *aksa, from Proto-Indo-European *Heh₃s- (ash) (compare Greek οξιά (oxiá, beech), Armenian հածի (haci), English ash).

Noun edit

ah m (plural ahe, definite ahu, definite plural ahet)

  1. beech (Fagus sylvatica)

Hyponyms edit

Further reading edit

  • “ah”, in FGJSSH: Fjalor i gjuhës së sotme shqipe [Dictionary of the modern Albanian language]‎[4] (in Albanian), 1980
  • ah”, in FGJSH: Fjalor i gjuhës shqipe [Dictionary of the Albanian language] (in Albanian), 2006

Chickasaw edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adverb edit

ah

  1. yes
    Synonym: hohmi

Danish edit

Etymology edit

Partly borrowed from German, English, French, from Latin ah (ah), from Proto-Indo-European . Partly also onomatopoeic.

Cognate with Norwegian Bokmål ah, English ah, German ah, French ah and Latin ah.

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ah

  1. used to express pleasure, e.g. because something tastes good or feels nice
    Coordinate terms: mm, mums, namnam
    ah, sikken en dejlig pandekage
    ah what a delicious pancake
    Synonym: uhm
    1. used to express pleasant surprise
      "ah, velkommen Albert," sagde Sickert til prinsen
      "ah, welcome Albert," said Sickert to the prince
      Synonym: minsandten
  2. used to express reservations, slight disagreement, doubt etc.
    bliver man også nervøs? Ah ikke så meget
    do you get nervous too? Ah, not so much
    Synonym: arh

References edit

Anagrams edit

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Interjection edit

ah

  1. ah, oh

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

Found in a wide variety of languages, including but not limited to Estonian ah, Ingrian ah, Karelian ah, Ludian ah, Veps ah, Votic ah, Hungarian ah, Swedish ah, German ah, English ah, Latin ah. Tracing an exact origin is effectively impossible. Probably ultimately involuntary or natural.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑh/, [ˈɑ̝h]
  • Rhymes: -ɑh
  • Syllabification(key): ah

Interjection edit

ah

  1. oh, ah

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French a! (oh! ah! woe!), of expressive origin.

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ah

  1. ah

Derived terms edit

References edit

Further reading edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ah

  1. ah (expression of understanding, etc.)

References edit

  • ah” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • ah” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • ah” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

German edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ah

  1. expressing understanding
  2. expressing contentment

Further reading edit

  • ah” in Duden online
  • ah” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Hungarian edit

Etymology edit

Involuntary expression of emotions: surprise, impatience, desire, sadness, refusal.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ah

  1. ah

References edit

  1. ^ ah in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further reading edit

  • ah in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • ah in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (‘A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress; published A–ez as of 2024)

Indonesian edit

Etymology edit

Unknown

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ah

  1. oh, expresses compassion, surprise and dismay

Further reading edit

Ingrian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Ultimately a natural sound. Compare Finnish ah and Estonian ah.

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ah

  1. Exclamation of wonder: oh!
    Ah kui siä oot käppiä!Oh how beautiful you are!

References edit

  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 3

Italian edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ah

  1. ah! (usually ironic or sarcastic)
    Synonym: ha

References edit

  1. ^ ah in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Anagrams edit

Juǀ'hoan edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

ah (upper case Ah)

  1. A letter of the Juǀ'hoan alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Latin edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Indo-European or perhaps *h₂eh₂.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

āh

  1. ah

References edit

  1. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2011) Comparative Indo-European Linguistics: An Introduction, revised and corrected by Michiel de Vaan, 2nd edition, Amsterdam, Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, page 250

Further reading edit

  • ah”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ah”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Min Nan edit

For pronunciation and definitions of ah – see (“duck”).
(This term, ah, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of ).
For pronunciation and definitions of ah – see (“particle expressing completion”).
(This term, ah, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of ).

Mokilese edit

Noun edit

ah

  1. (one's) thing

Usage notes edit

Like many terms in Mokilese, ah has no non-possessive form; the third person singular possessive form (one's/his/her/its thing) is therefore treated as the lemma.

Declension edit


Old English edit

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

ah

  1. (Anglian) Alternative form of ac (but)

Palikur edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

ah n or f

  1. (neuter) wood
  2. (feminine) tree

References edit

  • Languages of the Amazon (2012, →ISBN

Pohnpeian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

ah

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter A.

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

ah

  1. shark mullet (Rhinomugil nasutus), at a growth stage of approximately twelve inches

Etymology 3 edit

Conjunction edit

ah

  1. however, and, then
    I sukuhl, ah e doadoahk.
    I went to school, and he worked.
    Ma Soulik pahn iang, ah I sohte pahn iang.
    If Soulik goes, then I won't.

Etymology 4 edit

Alternative forms edit

Determiner edit

ah

  1. his, her, hers, its, third person singular possessive pronoun
    Liho iang ah pwoud.
    The woman joined her husband.

Etymology 5 edit

Interjection edit

ah

  1. Oh!; commonly used as an expression of approval.
    Ah, ke inenen mai.
    Oh, you are really good.

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ah!

  1. ah! (expression of relief, realization, awe)
  2. ah! (expression of woe, grief)

Quotations edit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:ah.

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection edit

ah

  1. ah

Somali edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb edit

ah

  1. (intransitive) To be
    Bariis oo macaan ah.Rice that is sweet.

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Imitative, similar to French ah.

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

ah

  1. ah (expression of relief, realization, awe)
  2. ah (expression of woe, grief)

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

ah

  1. Romanization of 𒄴 (aḫ)

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Interjection edit

ah

  1. ah; an expression of relief

Anagrams edit

Tulu-Bohuai edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ah

  1. coral lime (for chewing/eating with betelnut)

Further reading edit

  • Bohuai
  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)

Vilamovian edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Interjection edit

ah

  1. oh: expressing of surprise
  2. oh: expressing wonder, amazement, or awe
  3. oh: expressing understanding, recognition, or realization
  4. oh: preceding an offhand or annoyed remark
  5. oh: an invocation or address

Zou edit

Etymology edit

From earlier *ak (whence the possessive forms), from Proto-Kuki-Chin *ʔaar (chicken). Cognates include Khumi Chin ae and Mizo ár.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ah

  1. fowl
  2. (specifically) chicken (Gallus gallus)

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 49