Translingual

edit
 
 
Signal flag for the digit 8

Etymology

edit

Borrowed from English eight.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

eight

  1. (international standards) NATO & ICAO radiotelephony clear code (spelling-alphabet name) for the digit 8.
    Synonym: oktoeight (ITU/IMO)


ICAO/NATO radiotelephonic clear codes
code Alfa Bravo Charlie Delta Echo Foxtrot Golf Hotel India Juliett Kilo Lima Mike
November Oscar Papa Quebec Romeo Sierra Tango Uniform Victor Whiskey Xray Yankee Zulu
zero one two three (tree) four (fower) five (fife) six seven eight nine (niner) hundred thousand decimal
ICAO/NATO vs ITU/IMO radiotelephonic clear codes for digits
ICAO/NATO zero one two three (tree) four (fower) five (fife) six seven eight nine (niner)
ITU/IMO nadazero unaone bissotwo terrathree kartefour pantafive soxisix setteseven oktoeight novenine

References

edit
  1. ^ Annex 10 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation: Aeronautical Telecommunications; Volume II Communication Procedures including those with PANS status[1], 6th edition, International Civil Aviation Organization, 2001 October, archived from the original on 31 March 2019, page §5.2.1.4.3.1

English

edit
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English numbers (edit)
80
 ←  7 8 9  → 
    Cardinal: eight
    Ordinal: eighth
    Latinate ordinal: octonary
    Adverbial: eight times
    Multiplier: eightfold
    Latinate multiplier: octuple
    Distributive: octuply
    Group collective: eightsome
    Multipart collective: octuplet
    Greek or Latinate collective: octad
    Greek collective prefix: octo-, octa-
    Latinate collective prefix: octo-
    Fractional: eighth
    Latinate fractional prefix: octant-
    Elemental: octuplet
    Greek prefix: ogdo-
    Number of musicians: octet
    Number of years: octennium

Etymology 1

edit

From Middle English eighte, aught, eahte, ahte, from Old English eahta, from Proto-West Germanic *ahtō, from Proto-Germanic *ahtōu, from Proto-Indo-European *oḱtṓw.

Cognate with Scots aucht (eight), West Frisian acht (eight), Dutch acht (eight), Low German acht (eight), German acht (eight), Norwegian åtte (eight), Swedish åtta (eight), Icelandic átta (eight), Latin octo (eight), Ancient Greek ὀκτώ (oktṓ), Irish ocht (eight).

Alternative forms

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Numeral

edit

eight

  1. A numerical value equal to 8; the number occurring after seven and before nine.
    • 2009, Stuart Heritage, Hecklerspray, Friday the 22nd of May in 2009 at 1 o’clock p.m., “Jon & Kate Latest: People You Don’t Know Do Crap You Don’t Care About
      Jon & Kate Plus 8 is a show based on two facts: 1) Jon and Kate Gosselin have eight children, and 2) the word ‘Kate’ rhymes with the word ‘eight’. One suspects that if Kate were ever to have another child, a shady network executive would urge her to put it in a binbag with a brick and drop it down a well. But this is just a horrifying tangent.
  2. Describing a group or set with eight elements.
    He works eight hours a day.
edit
Descendants
edit
  • Sranan Tongo: aiti
Translations
edit
See also
edit

Noun

edit

eight (plural eights)

  1. The digit/figure 8.
  2. (playing cards) Any of the four cards in a normal deck with the value eight.
  3. (nautical) A light, narrow rowing boat, especially one used in competitive rowing, steered by a cox, in which eight rowers each have two oars.
  4. (rowing, especially in plural) A race in which such craft participate.
  5. (rowing) The eight people who crew a rowing-boat.
  6. Eight o'clock.
    • 1837, Thomas Carlyle, chapter I, in The French Revolution: A History [], volume III (The Guillotine), London: James Fraser, [], →OCLC, book IV (Terror):
      About eight on the Saturday morning, she purchases a large sheath-knife in the Palais Royal [...]
    • 1905, Guy Newell Boothby, “The Treasure of Sacramento Nick”, in A Crime of the Under-Seas[2], London: Ward Lock & Co Limited, →OCLC, →OL:
      Sharp at eight we were waiting on the wharf where the Messagerie boats lie, and wondering what the deuce was going to happen.
    • 1997 February 1 [1981 April 12], John Dunning, Deadline, New York: Simon & Schuster, Inc., →ISBN, →OCLC, →OL, page 263:
      Miranda showed him in at a quarter to eight, accompanied by a pretty young woman she introduced as Erin d'Angelo.
Derived terms
edit
Translations
edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also
edit
Playing cards in English · playing cards (layout · text)
             
ace deuce, two three four five six seven
             
eight nine ten jack, knave queen king joker

Adjective

edit

eight (not comparable)

  1. Obsolete spelling of eighth.

Etymology 2

edit

See ait.

Noun

edit

eight (plural eights)

  1. Alternative spelling of ait (island in a river)[2]
References
edit
  1. ^ Чипāлиннēсал декларāсиjачи нари доролбони/Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Orok language https://web.archive.org/web/20200625114645/http://www.simdp.com/uploads/files/FINAL_Declaration_Uilt_v4_RE_2.pdf
  2. ^ eight”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.

Anagrams

edit

Middle English

edit

Numeral

edit

eight

  1. Alternative form of eighte

Yola

edit

Etymology

edit

Spelling was influenced by English eight (/eɪt/).

Verb

edit

eight

  1. Alternative spelling of at (to eat)

References

edit
  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 38