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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

ita (plural itas)

  1. A kind of palm tree (Mauritia flexuosa), growing near the Orinoco.

AnagramsEdit


Alcozauca MixtecEdit

NounEdit

ita

  1. flower

Crimean GothicEdit

EtymologyEdit

cognate with North Germanic ett, eitt

NumeralEdit

ita

  1. one
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq:
      Jussus ita numerabat. Ita, tua, tria, fyder, fyuf, seis, sevene, prorsus, ut nos Flandri.

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

ita

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐍄𐌰

GuaraníEdit

NounEdit

ita

  1. stone

Hiri MotuEdit

PronounEdit

ita

  1. 1st-person plural pronoun inclusive: we, us (including you)

See alsoEdit


IdoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English that, Russian тот (tot), та (ta), то (to), Latin iste. Formed after ica (this).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ita (plural iti)

  1. (demonstrative pronoun) that (person)
    Ita esas plu forta, ma ica plu bela.That person is stronger, but this person is prettier.

DeterminerEdit

ita

  1. (demonstrative determiner) that
    Ita kamizo esas verda.That shirt blue.

Derived termsEdit

  • ito (that (thing))
  • iti (that (plural))
  • pro ito (therefore)

See alsoEdit

  • ibe (there)
  • lore (then)
  • tala (such kind of)
  • tanta (so much)

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

ita

  1. Rōmaji transcription of いた

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

May be derived from Proto-Indo-European *éy and *só. Compare item.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ita (not comparable)

  1. so
    Ita me territas.
    "You scare me so."
  2. yes
  3. thus
  4. therefore
  5. in this way

Usage notesEdit

Often coupled with ut

  1. Such that "ita x, ut y" = "so/thus x, as y"
    Non ita loquimur, ut physici.
    We do not say so/thus, as the physicians do.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ita in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ita” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) circumstances demand: tempus (ita) fert (not secum)
    • (ambiguous) this is our natural tendency, our destiny; nature compels us: ita (ea lege, ea condicione) nati sumus
    • (ambiguous) the facts are these; the matter stands thus: res ita est, ita (sic) se habet
    • (ambiguous) circumstances make this necessary; the exigencies of the case are these: res (ita) fert
    • (ambiguous) under such circumstances: quae cum ita sint
    • (ambiguous) my interests demanded it: meae rationes ita tulerunt
    • (ambiguous) convince yourself of this; rest assured on this point: velim tibi ita persuadeas
    • (ambiguous) anger is defined as a passionate desire for revenge: iracundiam sic (ita) definiunt, ut ulciscendi libidinem esse dicant or ut u. libido sit or iracundiam sic definiunt, ulc. libidinem
    • (ambiguous) to be so disposed: ita animo affectum esse
    • (ambiguous) as usually happens: ut fit, ita ut fit, ut fere fit
    • (ambiguous) so custom, fashion prescribes: ita fert consuetudo
    • (ambiguous) as you sow, so will you reap: ut sementem feceris, ita metes (proverb.) (De Or. 2. 65)
    • (ambiguous) so to speak (used to modify a figurative expression): ut ita dicam
    • (ambiguous) that is exactly what I think: ita prorsus existimo
    • (ambiguous) it is so: ita res est
    • (ambiguous) the matter stands so (otherwise): res ita (aliter) se habet
  • ita in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • Palmer, L.R. (1906) The Latin Language, London, Faber and Faber

Old FrisianEdit

VerbEdit

ita

  1. to eat

PipilEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Nahuan *(ɨ)hta, from Proto-Uto-Aztecan *hite or *hote. Compare Classical Nahuatl itta (to see)

PronunciationEdit

  • (standard) IPA(key): /ˈita/
  • (Cuisnahuat, Panchimalco) IPA(key): /ˈiða/

VerbEdit

-ita

  1. (transitive) to see, to look at
    Nikitak ne tunal kisa ka tapuyawa
    I saw the sun rising early in the morning
  2. (reflexive) to seem, to appear
    Muita ka ne metzti kitekimaka ne ajat
    It seems that the moon controls the waters
  3. (transitive) to deem, to think, to regard, to consider
    Wan taja ken tikita ne yankwik tamachtiani?
    And you, what do you think about the new teacher?
  4. (transitive) to check, to find out, to make sure
    Semaya nalejkutuk nikita asu tinechtalkulia se chiupi tumin
    I've come here just to check if you can give me a little bit of money
  5. (transitive) to figure out
    Unkan shikitakan tey ankimakat
    You figure out what you will give to her/him
  6. (transitive) to visit
    Ne nupilawan tesu walajtiwit nechita ka nuchan ini metzti
    My children have not come visit me at home this month

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

  • tachia (to see) (intransitive)

SwahiliEdit

VerbEdit

ita

  1. to call

TagalogEdit

NounEdit

ita

  1. aeta, aborigine of the Philippines.

SynonymsEdit


TetumEdit

PronounEdit

ita

  1. you (polite form of addressing older person)

Derived termsEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse eta, from Proto-Germanic *etaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ed-. Compare jäta and getu.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ita (preterite at or åt, supine iti or ite)

  1. to eat
    ita e snååln
    to eat in stinginess, to overeat when offered food
    he man it ini gröyta, fa man ånt isa fäte
what you eat from the cooking pot you won't have on your plate

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit