See also: AIO, -aio, and aîó

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑi̯oˣ/, [ˈɑi̯o̞(ʔ)]
  • Rhymes: -ɑio
  • Syllabification: ai‧o

VerbEdit

aio

  1. Present indicative connegative form of aikoa.
  2. Second-person singular imperative form of aikoa.
  3. Second-person singular imperative connegative form of aikoa.

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested since circa 1300. Either from the feminine aia, itself supposedly from Latin avia (grandmother), or from Gothic *𐌷𐌰𐌲𐌾𐌰 (*hagja, protector).[1] Cognate with Portuguese aio and Spanish ayo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aio m (plural aios, feminine aia, feminine plural aias)

  1. (historical) tutor, governor of a child
    • 1370, R. Lorenzo (ed.), Crónica troiana. Introducción e texto. A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 735:
      Et sabede que nõ ouuerõ mester ayos, ca todo aprendíã moy bẽ de seu, quanto lles cõvĩjna.
      And you must know that they didn't need tutors, because all they learned very well by themselves, everything that suited them
    Synonym: titor

ReferencesEdit

  • ayo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • ayo” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • aio” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • aio” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

ItalianEdit

EtimologyEdit

Compare Sicilian aju.

NounEdit

aio m (plural ai, feminine aia)

  1. tutor, teacher

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ǵyéti, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eǵ- (to say).

Cognate with Latin adā̆gium, prōdigium, Ancient Greek ἠμί (ēmí, to say), Old Armenian ասեմ (asem, to say), and Proto-Tocharian *āks- (to announce, proclaim, instruct). See also negō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

aiō (present infinitive aiere, perfect active ait); third conjugation iō-variant, irregular, highly defective

  1. I say, I assert, I say yes, I affirm
    • Stanislaus Julien translating Mencius as Meng Tseu, p. 46:
      Cōnfūcius aiēbat...
      Confucius said...
    • -Ain' vērō?
      -Aiō.
      -What, really?
      -Yeah, really.
    • 16 BCE, Ovid, Amores 3.7.77:
      ‘Quid mē lūdis?’, ait, ‘Quis tē, male sāne, iubēbat...?
      “Are you making fun of me?“, she says, “Are you stupid? Who asked you to...?“
    • 65 BCE – 8 BCE, Horace, Epistulae 1.16:
      ‘...servus, ‘habēs pretium, lōrīs nōn ūreris,’ aiō.
      I tell him (the slave), “You have your reward: you aren't flogged.”
    Synonyms: dīcō, inquam
    Antonym: negō

ConjugationEdit

   Conjugation of aiō (third conjugation iō-variant, irregular, active only, highly defective)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present aiō ais ait aiunt
imperfect aiēbam aiēbās aiēbat aiēbāmus aiēbātis aiēbant
perfect aistī ait
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present aiās aiat aiant
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present ai
future
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives aiere
participles aiēns

Usage notesEdit

  • Often spelt āiō, etc. with long ā before consonantal i, especially in older editions, even though the a is in fact short. This is to mark the syllable as long by position due to the regularly-double morpheme-internal /j/, which is normally spelt as single in modern editions.
  • The full spelling is said to have been used by Cicero among others, who wrote AIIO, AIIUNT, AIIEBANT, as well as MAIIOR (maior), EIIUS (eius), etc. Other writers and makers of inscriptions used the ī longa (tall I), e.g. AꟾO, EꟾUS, or even a combination AIꟾO, EIꟾUS.
  • 3rd-person singular ait, the most common form, is normally attested as a disyllabic with two light syllables, that is [ˈa.ɪt], not [ˈaj.jɪt] with a first heavy syllable.
  • The original forms with long ī, including before final t, can be found in Plautus, e.g. aīs, aīt, later undergoing iambic shortening.
  • Also in Plautus can be found diphthongal forms such as a͡is (one syllable), a͡it (one syllable), a͡ibam/a͡ibās/a͡ibāt (two syllables), etc.
  • ait is also used in past narration; through its reinterpretation as a perfect-tense form, aistī is found post-Classically.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • aio in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • aio in Charlton T. Lewis, An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1891
  • aio in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden, Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co., 1894
    • to do a thing which is not one's vocation, which goes against the grain: adversante et repugnante natura or invitā Minervā (ut aiunt) aliquid facere (Off. 1. 31. 110)
    • as the proverb says: ut or quod or quomodo aiunt, ut or quemadmodum dicitur
    • (ambiguous) as Homer sings (not canit): ut ait Homerus
    • (ambiguous) as Cicero says: ut ait Cicero (always in this order)

PohnpeianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aio

  1. yesterday
    Likamwete e kohdo aio.
    Apparently he came yesterday.

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From aia (hired tutoress), of uncertain origin, possibly from Latin avia (grandmother) or Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌲𐌾𐌰 (hagja, protector).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aio m (plural aios, feminine aia, feminine plural aias)

  1. a hired tutor

See alsoEdit


RotokasEdit

VerbEdit

aio

  1. eat

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit