English edit

 
The bole (trunk) of a tree
 
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Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English bole, from Old Norse bolr, akin to Danish bul and German Bohle (plank). See also bulwark (defensive wall).

Noun edit

bole (plural boles)

  1. The trunk or stem of a tree.
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Ancient Greek βῶλος (bôlos, clod or lump of earth): compare French bol. Doublet of bolus.

Noun edit

bole (countable and uncountable, plural boles)

  1. Any of several varieties of friable earthy clay, usually coloured red by iron oxide, and composed essentially of hydrous silicates of alumina, or more rarely of magnesia.
    • 2018 April 14, “8 things to know about İznik pottery”, in Christie's[1]:
      Good Iznik has strong colours well-contained within their outlines and a very clean, clear white. The red colour, made with Armenian bole (an earthy clay) should be thick and proud of the surface.
  2. (colour) The shade of reddish brown which resembles this clay.
    bole:  
  3. (obsolete) A bolus; a dose.
    • 1649, Jeremy Taylor, “An Apology for Authorized and Set Forms of Liturgy Against the Pretence of the Spirit”, in Charles Page Eden, editor, The Whole Works of the Right Rev. Jeremy Taylor, D.D., volume V, published 1849, page 294:
      [] or else [] the churches were very incurious to swallow such a bole, if no pretension could have been reasonably made for their justification.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

bole (plural boles)

  1. Alternative form of boll (old unit of measure).
    • 1707, J[ohn] Mortimer, The Whole Art of Husbandry; or, The Way of Managing and Improving of Land. [], 2nd edition, London: [] J[ohn] H[umphreys] for H[enry] Mortlock [], and J[onathan] Robinson [], published 1708, →OCLC:
      Take then good Barley newly thrashed and well purged from the Chaff, and put thereof eight Boles, that is about ſix English Quarters, in a Stone - trough

Etymology 4 edit

Noun edit

bole (plural boles)

  1. (Scotland) An aperture with a shutter in the wall of a house, to admit air or light.
    • 1816, Walter Scott, The Antiquary, Adam and Charles Black, published 1862, page 220:
      "Open the bole," said the old woman firmly and hastily to her daughter-in-law, “open the bole wi' speed, that I may see if this be the right Lord Geraldin [] .
  2. (Scotland) A small closet.

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Variant of bolle. Occurs exclusively in the plural form.

Noun edit

bole m pl

  1. testicles

Related terms edit

Buol edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balay, from Proto-Austronesian *balay.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bole

  1. house

Czech edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

bole

  1. vocative singular of bol

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

bole

  1. present masculine singular transgressive of bolet

Dama (Sierra Leone) edit

Etymology edit

Perhaps related to Vai [script needed] (boi, structure without walls) or Mende bolo (courthouse with high walls) (having the definite form bolei.

Noun edit

bole

  1. courthouse

References edit

  • Dalby, T. D. P. (1963), “The extinct language of Dama”, in Sierra Leone Language Review, volume 2, Freetown: Fourah Bay College, pages 50–54

Galician edit

Verb edit

bole

  1. third-person singular present indicative of bulir
  2. (reintegrationist norm) inflection of bulir:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Latvian edit

Etymology edit

From English bowl, probably via German Bowle. Alternative historical forms: bols. First attested use to mean a bowl for making punch – 1880. First attested use to refer to the beverage itself – 1886.[1]

Pronunciation edit

(file)

Noun edit

bole f (5th declension)

  1. (dated sense) a bowl for making punch
    Bowle: bole (punša un citu tādu dzērienu kauss) – Bowle (German): bole (a bowl for punch or similar drinks).[2]
  2. punch (drink made of wine, diluted with juices, syrups and fruit, often with added cognac or rhum)
    zemeņu bole – strawberry punch
    boles traukspunch bowl

Declension edit

Synonyms edit

References edit

  1. ^ “bole” in Juris Baldunčiks (1989), Anglicismi latviešu valodā (Rīga: «Zinātne») →ISBN.
  2. ^ Brasche G., (1880), Deutsch-lettisches Wörterbuch, Riga; Leipzig, page 152.

Lower Sorbian edit

Verb edit

bole

  1. Superseded spelling of bóle.

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From a mixture of Old English bula, *bulla, and Old Norse boli, both from Proto-Germanic *bulô.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbul(ə)/, /ˈbuːl(ə)/, /ˈbɔːl(ə)/

Noun edit

bole (plural boles or bolen)

  1. bull, steer, male cow
  2. (heraldry) A heraldic bull
  3. (astrology) Taurus (zodiac)
  4. (astronomy) Taurus (constellation)
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • English: bull
  • Scots: bul, bull

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse bolr.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bole (plural boles)

  1. trunk, bole
  2. tree
Descendants edit

References edit

Portuguese edit

Verb edit

bole

  1. inflection of bolar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative
  2. inflection of bulir:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Serbo-Croatian edit

Participle edit

bole (Cyrillic spelling боле)

  1. feminine plural active past participle of bosti

West Makian edit

Etymology edit

From Malay boleh (can, may, possible).

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

bole

  1. good, fine!

References edit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[2], Pacific linguistics