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EnglishEdit

 
bolo machetes

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Philippine Spanish.

NounEdit

 
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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

bolo (plural bolos)

  1. A long, heavy, single-edged machete.
  2. (attributive) a type of punch; an uppercut.
    • 1953, Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye, Penguin 2010, p. 141:
      He jerked me off balance and the hand with the brass knucks came around in a looping bolo punch.
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

bolo (third-person singular simple present bolos, present participle boloing, simple past and past participle boloed)

  1. To attack or despatch with a bolo knife.

Etymology 2Edit

Supposedly named after Bolo Pascha, a German agent in France during World War I.

NounEdit

bolo (plural bolos)

  1. A soldier not capable of the minimum standards of marksmanship.

VerbEdit

bolo (third-person singular simple present bolos, present participle boloing, simple past and past participle boloed)

  1. To fail to meet the minimum standards of marksmanship.

Etymology 3Edit

From Argentine Spanish boleadora (lariat).

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

bolo (plural bolos)

  1. A string or leather necktie secured with an ornamental slide.

VerbEdit

bolo (third-person singular simple present bolos, present participle boloing, simple past and past participle boloed)

  1. (transitive, nonce word) To dress (somebody) in a bolo.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter I, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      Selwyn, sitting up rumpled and cross-legged on the floor, after having boloed Drina to everybody's exquisite satisfaction, looked around at the sudden rustle of skirts to catch a glimpse of a vanishing figure—a glimmer of ruddy hair and the white curve of a youthful face, half-buried in a muff.

Etymology 4Edit

An acronym of Be on the lookout.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

bolo (plural bolos)

  1. (US law enforcement) A request for law enforcement officers to be on the lookout for a suspect.
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


BambaraEdit

NounEdit

bolo

  1. arm

GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bolo m (plural bolos)

  1. sand lance (Ammodytes)
    Synonym: areeiro

Etymology 2Edit

From bola (piece of bread), from Latin bulla (buble).

 
Bolos

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bolo m (plural bolos)

  1. bun, roll
    • 1409, J. L. Pensado Tomé (ed.), Tratado de Albeitaria. Santiago de Compostela: Centro Ramón Piñeiro, page 129:
      Para esto ual o ouo torrado ataa que se faça duro et depois tollelle a casca et faz tal como bollo
      For this you must use egg, roasted till its hard; remove then the shell and make a roll with it
  2. piece of bread
    • 1396, M. Romaní Martínez (ed.), La colección diplomática de Santa María de Oseira (1025-1310). Santiago: Tórculo Edicións, page 449:
      daredes hun dia de seara de cada anno en a nosa granja de Vales, e hun bolo de triigo
      and you'll give a day of work each year at our farm of Vales, and a piece of wheat bread
  3. ball of butter
    Synonym: pela
  4. lump
    Synonym: grumo
  5. clod
    Synonym: terrón
  6. pebble
    Synonym: croio
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • bolo” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • bolo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • bolo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • bolo” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

IdoEdit

NounEdit

bolo (plural boli)

  1. bowl

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin bōlus (clod of earth, lump), from Ancient Greek βωλος (bōlos, clod, lump).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bolo m (plural boli)

  1. bolus
  2. cud

AnagramsEdit


JavaneseEdit

NounEdit

bolo

  1. Nonstandard spelling of bala.

LingalaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bore.

NounEdit

bolo class 9a

  1. boron

PortugueseEdit

 
bolo (1.1)

Etymology 1Edit

From bola.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bolo m (plural bolos)

  1. (cooking) cake
    1. dessert made with dough and sugar; common in celebrations
    2. any of various snacks made with dough, both sweet and salty
      Synonym: bolinho
  2. bunch, heap, mass (load of some material or of beings)
    Synonyms: monte, amontoado
    1. a bunch of money
  3. prize, reward
    Synonyms: prêmio, recompensa
  4. (Brazil) something said or done to mislead or deceive
    Synonyms: enganação, burla
  5. (Brazil) disarray, disorder chaos
    Synonyms: desordem, caos, confusão
  6. (Brazil, slang) the act of standing someone up (missing an appointment)
    Synonym: furo

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Kabuverdianu: bolu

Etymology 2Edit

Non-lemma forms.

VerbEdit

bolo

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of bolar

SlovakEdit

ParticipleEdit

bolo

  1. neuter singular l-participle of byť

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin bolus.

NounEdit

bolo m (plural bolos)

  1. bolus
  2. (in the plural) bowling

AdjectiveEdit

bolo (feminine singular bola, masculine plural bolos, feminine plural bolas)

  1. (colloquial, Central America) drunk
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:borracho
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of bolívar

NounEdit

bolo m (plural bolos)

  1. (Venezuela, slang) A bolívar (Venezuelan unit of currency)

Etymology 3Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

bolo m (plural bolos)

  1. (colloquial) gig

Etymology 4Edit

From Tagalog bolo.

NounEdit

bolo m (plural bolos)

  1. (Philippines) bolo (long, single-edged machete)

Further readingEdit


TagalogEdit

NounEdit

bolo

  1. bolo (long, single-edged machete)

See alsoEdit


TernateEdit

ConjunctionEdit

bolo

  1. or

ReferencesEdit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001). A Descriptive Study of the Language of Ternate, the Northern Moluccas, Indonesia. University of Pittsburgh.