Open main menu
See also: bilé and bilë

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Mid 16th century, via Middle French, from Latin bīlis (bile).

NounEdit

bile (usually uncountable, plural biles)

  1. (biochemistry) A bitter brownish-yellow or greenish-yellow secretion produced by the liver, stored in the gall bladder, and discharged into the duodenum where it aids the process of digestion.
  2. bitterness of temper; ill humour; irascibility.
  3. Two of the four humours, black bile or yellow bile, in ancient and medieval physiology.
    • 1890, Walter Scott, The Journal of Sir Walter Scott[1]:
      I shall tire of my Journal if it is to contain nothing but biles and plasters and unguents.
    • 1616, Alexander Roberts, A Treatise of Witchcraft[2]:
      He spake out of the Pythonesse, Act. 16. 17. brought downe fire from heauen, and consumed Iobs sheepe 7000. and his seruants, raised a storme, strooke the house wherein his sonnes and daughters feasted with their elder brother, smote the foure corners of it, with the ruine whereof they all were destroyed, and perished: and ouerspread the body of that holy Saint their father with botches[t] and biles from the sole of his foot to the crowne of his head.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Akin to Dutch buil and German Beule.

NounEdit

bile (plural biles)

  1. (obsolete) A boil (kind of swelling).

VerbEdit

bile (third-person singular simple present biles, present participle biling, simple past and past participle biled)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of boil.
    • 1912, Stella George Stern Perry, Melindy (page 130)
      We pretty near biled ourselves and Miss Euly done got her bes' pink apron stained, an' I dropped Sis Suky's big kitchen spoon in de hogshead of sand []

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for bile in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *bālnai, from Proto-Indo-European *bhḷəno, from *bʰel- (to blow, swell), related to bolle. Compare Ancient Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis), Latin follis (bellows), Old Irish ball (member, body part) and Modern High German Bille (penis)

NounEdit

bile f

  1. penis

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bil/
  • (file)

NounEdit

bile f (uncountable)

  1. bile

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish bile, from Proto-Celtic *belyom (tree), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰolyo- (leaf).

NounEdit

bile m (genitive singular bile, nominative plural bilí)

  1. tree, especially a large, ancient, sacred one
  2. scion; distinguished person
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

bile m (genitive singular bile, nominative plural bilí)

  1. rim (of vessel)

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bile bhile mbile
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • "bile" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • G. Toner, S. Arbuthnot, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, D. Wodtko, editors (1913–76), “1 bile”, in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Dublin: Royal Irish Aacademy, →ISBN

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

Probably borrowed from Latin bīlis (bile).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bile f (plural bili)

  1. (physiology) bile
  2. anger

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *belyos (tree), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰolyo- (leaf). Cognate with Latin folium, Ancient Greek φύλλον (phúllon), and Old Armenian բողբոջ (bołboǰ).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bile m (genitive bili, nominative plural bili)

  1. tree, especially a large, ancient, sacred one

DeclensionEdit

Masculine io-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative bile bileL biliL
Vocative bili bileL biliu
Accusative bileN bileL biliuH
Genitive biliL bileL bileN
Dative biliuL bilib bilib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
bile bile
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mbile
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • G. Toner, S. Arbuthnot, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, D. Wodtko, editors (1913–76), “1 bile”, in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Dublin: Royal Irish Aacademy, →ISBN

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin bilis.

NounEdit

bile f (uncountable)

  1. gall; bile

SynonymsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

bile f (genitive singular bile, plural bilean)

  1. lip (of mouth)
  2. rim (of container)
  3. brim (of hat)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English bill.

NounEdit

bile m (genitive singular bile, plural bilean)

  1. bill (for law)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish [Term?] (Turkish bile).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bǐle/
  • Hyphenation: bi‧le

AdverbEdit

bìle (Cyrillic spelling бѝле)

  1. (regional) moreover, even
    bile je i on došao čak i on — even he came

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ottoman Turkish [Term?], from Old Turkic birle(birle), from Proto-Turkic *bile (with, together, also).

ConjunctionEdit

bile

  1. neither, even

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle Dutch bile or Middle Low German bîle, bîl (axe), both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *bilją.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bile c (plural bilen, diminutive byltsje)

  1. axe

Further readingEdit

  • bile”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011