See also: Empire and empiré

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology edit

From Middle English empire, from Old French empire, empere, from Latin imperium, inperium (command, control, dominion, sovereignty, a dominion, empire), from imperare, inperare (to command, order), from in (in, on) + parare (to make ready, order). Doublet of empery and imperium.

Pronunciation edit

 
A map showing The First French Empire in 1810.

Noun edit

empire (plural empires)

  1. A political state, often a monarchy, that has achieved a much greater current size than its initial size by conquering surrounding territories, cities or nations.
    the Russian empire
    • 2022 February 7, Charles Hugh Smith, How Empires Die[1]:
      States and empires fail when they are no longer the solution, they are the problem.
  2. A political unit ruled by an emperor or empress.
    The Empire of Vietnam was a short-lived client state of Japan governing Vietnam between March 11 and August 23, 1945.
  3. The group of states or other territories that owe allegiance to an imperial power (foreign to them), when distinguished from the native territory of that power; imperial possessions.
    • 2001 August 2, P. J. Marshall, The Cambridge Illustrated History of the British Empire, Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 105:
      British people [...] continued to believe in empire. It was what gave Britain a unique role in the world, and in return Britain had drawn strength from its empire to enable it to survive two great wars that had wrecked so many of its competitors. Imperial management in the twentieth []
    • 2021 April 13, Daniel Verdier, Democracy and International Trade: Britain, France, and the United States, 1860-1990, Princeton University Press, →ISBN, page 139:
      Since Britain imported mainly foodstuffs from its empire, no preferences could be granted to the colonies without Britain first imposing a tariff on foodstuffs imported from other countries.
  4. An expansive and powerful enterprise under the control of one person or group.
    the McDonald's fast food empire
    • 2002, Evelyn L. Damore, The Rattle and Hiss of the Tin Gods, iUniverse, →ISBN, page 111:
      “Revenues for Jackson's non-profit empire sky-rocketed from $4 million in 1997, to more than $14 million just two years later.”
    • 2009, Martin Short, The Rise of the Mafia, Kings Road Publishing, →ISBN:
      The Mafia never forgave Castro but Lansky had already laid the foundations of a mob gambling empire all over the Caribbean []
  5. (Absolute) control, dominion, sway.
    • 1881, François Guizot, The History of Civilization from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the French Revolution..., page 122:
      The brutality, the unthinking, the unreflecting character of the barbarians were so great, that the new faith, the new feelings with which they had been inspired, exercised but a very slight empire over them.
    • 1898, H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, London: William Heinemann, page 1:
      With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter.
    • 2010, Stefania Tutino, Empire of Souls: Robert Bellarmine and the Christian Commonwealth, Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 270:
      [] could gain some political strength for the pope, but in so doing the pope would lose the uniqueness and supremacy of his empire over souls: []

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Adjective edit

empire (not comparable)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Empire.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Finnish edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈempire/, [ˈe̞mpire̞]
  • Rhymes: -empire
  • Syllabification(key): em‧pi‧re

Noun edit

empire

  1. (art) Short for empiretyyli (Empire style).

Declension edit

Inflection of empire (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative empire empiret
genitive empiren empirejen
partitive empireä empirejä
illative empireen empireihin
singular plural
nominative empire empiret
accusative nom. empire empiret
gen. empiren
genitive empiren empirejen
empireinrare
partitive empireä empirejä
inessive empiressä empireissä
elative empirestä empireistä
illative empireen empireihin
adessive empirellä empireillä
ablative empireltä empireiltä
allative empirelle empireille
essive empirenä empireinä
translative empireksi empireiksi
abessive empirettä empireittä
instructive empirein
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of empire (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative empireni empireni
accusative nom. empireni empireni
gen. empireni
genitive empireni empirejeni
empireinirare
partitive empireäni empirejäni
inessive empiressäni empireissäni
elative empirestäni empireistäni
illative empireeni empireihini
adessive empirelläni empireilläni
ablative empireltäni empireiltäni
allative empirelleni empireilleni
essive empirenäni empireinäni
translative empirekseni empireikseni
abessive empirettäni empireittäni
instructive
comitative empireineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative empiresi empiresi
accusative nom. empiresi empiresi
gen. empiresi
genitive empiresi empirejesi
empireisirare
partitive empireäsi empirejäsi
inessive empiressäsi empireissäsi
elative empirestäsi empireistäsi
illative empireesi empireihisi
adessive empirelläsi empireilläsi
ablative empireltäsi empireiltäsi
allative empirellesi empireillesi
essive empirenäsi empireinäsi
translative empireksesi empireiksesi
abessive empirettäsi empireittäsi
instructive
comitative empireinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative empiremme empiremme
accusative nom. empiremme empiremme
gen. empiremme
genitive empiremme empirejemme
empireimmerare
partitive empireämme empirejämme
inessive empiressämme empireissämme
elative empirestämme empireistämme
illative empireemme empireihimme
adessive empirellämme empireillämme
ablative empireltämme empireiltämme
allative empirellemme empireillemme
essive empirenämme empireinämme
translative empireksemme empireiksemme
abessive empirettämme empireittämme
instructive
comitative empireinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative empirenne empirenne
accusative nom. empirenne empirenne
gen. empirenne
genitive empirenne empirejenne
empireinnerare
partitive empireänne empirejänne
inessive empiressänne empireissänne
elative empirestänne empireistänne
illative empireenne empireihinne
adessive empirellänne empireillänne
ablative empireltänne empireiltänne
allative empirellenne empireillenne
essive empirenänne empireinänne
translative empireksenne empireiksenne
abessive empirettänne empireittänne
instructive
comitative empireinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative empirensä empirensä
accusative nom. empirensä empirensä
gen. empirensä
genitive empirensä empirejensä
empireinsärare
partitive empireään
empireänsä
empirejään
empirejänsä
inessive empiressään
empiressänsä
empireissään
empireissänsä
elative empirestään
empirestänsä
empireistään
empireistänsä
illative empireensä empireihinsä
adessive empirellään
empirellänsä
empireillään
empireillänsä
ablative empireltään
empireltänsä
empireiltään
empireiltänsä
allative empirelleen
empirellensä
empireilleen
empireillensä
essive empirenään
empirenänsä
empireinään
empireinänsä
translative empirekseen
empireksensä
empireikseen
empireiksensä
abessive empirettään
empirettänsä
empireittään
empireittänsä
instructive
comitative empireineen
empireinensä

Further reading edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old French empire, from Latin imperium.

Noun edit

empire m (plural empires)

  1. empire
  2. influence, authority, dominion
    • 1640, Pierre Corneille, Horace, act 4, scene 7:
      Quelle injustice aux Dieux, d’abandonner au femmes / Un empire si grand sur les plus belles âmes
      What injustice from the gods, to give up for women / Such great dominion over the most beautiful souls
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Russian: ампи́р (ampír)

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

empire

  1. inflection of empirer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Italian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Vulgar Latin *implīre~*implĕre, from Latin implēre.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /emˈpi.re/
  • Rhymes: -ire
  • Hyphenation: em‧pì‧re

Verb edit

empìre (first-person singular present émpio, first-person singular past historic empìi or (less common) empiéi, past participle empìto or (less common) empiùto, auxiliary avére) (transitive)

  1. (uncommon, literally) to fill [+ di (object) = with]
  2. (figuratively) to fill, to stuff [+ di (object) = with]
    empire di gioiato fill with joy
    empire la testa di qualcuno di chiacchiereto fill someone's head with chatter
  3. (archaic or literary) to satisfy, to satiate

Conjugation edit

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Old French empire, empere, from Latin imperium, inperium (command, control, dominion, sovereignty, a dominion, empire), from imperare, inperare (to command, order), from in (in, on) + parare (to make ready, order). Doublet of emperie.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɛmˈpiːr(ə)/, /ɛmˈpɛːr(ə)/, /ˈɛmpiːr(ə)/, /am-/

Noun edit

empire

  1. Emperorship; the office, power or title of emperor.
  2. An empire; the domain of an emperor or empress.
  3. (rare) Total power or influence, especially when wielded by gods.
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[3], published c. 1410, Apocalips 1:5-6, page 117v; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      [⁊ of iheſu criſt] þat is a feiþful witneſſe .· þe firſte bigeten of deed men · ⁊ pꝛynce of kyngis of þe erþe / which louyde vs / ⁊ waiſchide vs fro oure ſynnes in his blood .· / ⁊ made vs a kyngdom / ⁊ pꝛeſtis to god ⁊ to his fadir / to hym be gloꝛie ⁊ empire .· in to woꝛldis of woꝛldis
      [of Jesus Christ,] / who is a reliable witness, the firstborn of the dead, and sovereign over the rulers of the Earth, who loved us, cleansed us from our sins with his blood, / and made us a kingdom / and priests of God and his father. To him are glory and power for many ages.
  4. (rare) A region of control; a field or zone.
  5. (rare, Christianity) God's kingdom in the heavens.

Descendants edit

References edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin imperium, inperium (command, control, dominion, sovereignty, a dominion, empire), from imperare, inperare (to command, order), from in (in, on) + parare (to make ready, order).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /emˈpiɾə/, (late) /amˈpiɾə/

Noun edit

empire oblique singularm (oblique plural empires, nominative singular empires, nominative plural empire)

  1. empire

Descendants edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French Empire.

Adjective edit

empire m or f or n (masculine plural empiri, feminine and neuter plural empire)

  1. (art) Empire

Declension edit

References edit

  • empire in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN