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See also: Most, móst, mōst, mošt, -most, and мост

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English most, moste, from Old English mǣst, māst, from Proto-Germanic *maistaz, *maist. Cognate with Scots mast, maist (most), Saterland Frisian maast (most), West Frisian meast (most), Dutch meest (most), German meist (most), Danish and Swedish mest (most), Icelandic mestur (most).

DeterminerEdit

most

  1. superlative degree of much.
    The teams competed to see who could collect the most money.
  2. superlative degree of many: the comparatively largest number of (construed with the definite article)
    The team with the most points wins.
  3. superlative degree of many: the majority of; more than half of (construed without the definite article)
    Most bakers and dairy farmers have to get up early.
    Winning was not important for most participants.
SynonymsEdit
  • (superlative of much): more than half of (in meaning, not grammar), almost all
  • (superlative of many): the majority of (in meaning, not grammar)
TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

most (not comparable)

  1. Forms the superlative of many adjectives.
    This is the most important example.
    Correctness is most important.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 7, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      With some of it on the south and more of it on the north of the great main thoroughfare that connects Aldgate and the East India Docks, St. Bede's at this period of its history was perhaps the poorest and most miserable parish in the East End of London.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, in A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      “[…] the awfully hearty sort of Christmas cards that people do send to other people that they don't know at all well. You know. The kind that have mottoes [] . And then, when you see [the senders], you probably find that they are the most melancholy old folk with malignant diseases. […]”
  2. To a great extent or degree; highly; very.
    This is a most unusual specimen.
    • 1750, Thomas Morell (lyrics), George Frideric Handel (music), “'Theodora'”‎[2]:
      Most cruel edict! Sure, thy generous soul, Septimius, abhors the dreadful task of persecution.
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine Chapter X
      Now, I still think that for this box of matches to have escaped the wear of time for immemorial years was a strange, and for me, a most fortunate thing.
  3. superlative form of many: most many
  4. superlative form of much: most much
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.
AntonymsEdit
The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}} to add them to the appropriate sense(s).
  • fewest (with countable nouns)
  • least (especially with uncountable nouns)
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

PronounEdit

most

  1. The greater part of a group, especially a group of people.
    Most want the best for their children.
    The peach was juicier and more flavourful than most.
SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

most (usually uncountable, plural mosts)

  1. (uncountable) The greatest amount.
    The most I can offer for the house is $150,000.
  2. (countable, uncountable) The greater part.
    Most of the penguins were friendly and curious.
    • 1892, Walter Besant, chapter III, in The Ivory Gate: A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 16832619:
      At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors. [] In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess[3]:
      The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. [] The second note, the high alarum, not so familiar and always important since it indicates the paramount sin in Man's private calendar, took most of them by surprise although they had been well prepared.
    • 2013 August 16, John Vidal, “Dams endanger ecology of Himalayas”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 10, page 8:
      Most of the Himalayan rivers have been relatively untouched by dams near their sources. Now the two great Asian powers, India and China, are rushing to harness them as they cut through some of the world's deepest valleys.
    Most of the rice was spoiled.
  3. (countable) A record-setting amount.
    • 2001, George Barna, Real Teens: A Contemporary Snapshot of Youth Culture, →ISBN, page 15:
      Along with their massive size will come other “mosts”: they will likely be the longest living, the best educated, the wealthiest and the most wired/ wireless.
    • 2002, John Gregory Selby, Virginians at War: The Civil War Experiences of Seven Young Confederates, →ISBN, page xvii:
      Virginia had a number of "mosts” that made it appealing, if not representative of all Confederate states: the most citizens among the Southern states; the most slaves; the most men under arms; the most famous Southern generals; the most fighting within its borders; the most divided by the war (what other Southern state lost a quarter of its territory and saw a new state created out of that former territory?); and the most damaged by the war.
    • 2007, Joe Moscheo, The Gospel Side of Elvis, →ISBN:
      The record of Elvis' achievement is truly remarkable; his list of “firsts” and “mosts” is probably without parallel in music and entertainment history.
Usage notesEdit
  • In the sense of record, used when the positive denotation of best does not apply.

Etymology 2Edit

Reduction of almost.

AdverbEdit

most (not comparable)

  1. (informal, chiefly US) Almost.
    • 2000, Jewish Baltimore: A Family Album →ISBN, page 159:
      "We walked there most every day after school."
    • 2011, Charlotte Maclay, Wanted: A Dad to Brag About →ISBN:
      “Can't be all that bad if Luke likes it. Most everywhere has air-conditioning, he says.”
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • most at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mustum.

NounEdit

most m (plural mosts or mostos)

  1. must (fruit juice that will ferment or has fermented)

Further readingEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *mostъ (bridge)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

most m inan

  1. bridge

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mustum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

most m (uncountable, diminutive mostje n)

  1. must (unfermented or partially fermented mashed grapes or rarely other fruits, an early stage in the production of wine)

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mustum.

NounEdit

most m (plural mosts)

  1. must (unfermented grape juice or wine)

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the earlier ma (now), which in modern Hungarian means “today” -st. For the suffix, compare valamelyest.[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

most

  1. now

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

Lower SorbianEdit

NounEdit

most m (diminutive mosćik)

  1. Superseded spelling of móst.

DeclensionEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German most, must, from Latin mustum

NounEdit

most m (definite singular mosten, indefinite plural moster, definite plural mostene)

  1. must, (unfermented) fruit juice, particularly grape juice

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German most, must, from Latin mustum

NounEdit

most m (definite singular mosten, indefinite plural mostar, definite plural mostane)

  1. must, (unfermented) fruit juice, particularly grape juice

ReferencesEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mustum.

NounEdit

most m

  1. must

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
 
most

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *mostъ (bridge)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

most m inan

  1. bridge (building over a river or valley)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • most in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *mostъ (bridge)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mȏst m (Cyrillic spelling мо̑ст)

  1. bridge (construction or natural feature that spans a divide)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *mostъ (bridge)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

most m (genitive singular mosta, nominative plural mosty, genitive plural mostov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. bridge

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • most in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *mostъ (bridge)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

móst m inan (genitive mostú or mósta, nominative plural mostôvi or mósti)

  1. bridge (construction or natural feature that spans a divide)

DeclensionEdit


VolapükEdit

NounEdit

most (plural mosts)

  1. monster

DeclensionEdit