See also: -fil, Fil-, fil., fiľ, fíl, and fîl

Translingual edit

Symbol edit

fil

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Filipino.

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1 edit

Of North Germanic origin, from Swedish fil. Also related to Finnish viili.

Noun edit

fil (uncountable)

  1. A Nordic dairy product, similar to yogurt, but using different bacteria which give a different taste and texture.

Etymology 2 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

fil (plural fils)

  1. (chess) Alternative form of alfil.

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish فیل (fil).

Noun edit

fil f (plural fila or (archaic) file)

  1. elephant
    Synonym: elefant
  2. (chess) bishop
    Synonym: oficer
Related terms edit

References edit

  • “fil i”, in FGJSSH: Fjalor i gjuhës së sotme shqipe [Dictionary of the modern Albanian language]‎[2] (in Albanian), 1980, page 470a
  • Bufli, G., Rocchi, L. (2021) “fil”, in A historical-etymological dictionary of Turkisms in Albanian (1555–1954), Trieste: Edizioni Università di Trieste, page 159
  • Mann, S. E. (1948) “fil”, in An Historical Albanian–English Dictionary, London: Longmans, Green & Co., page 107a
  • Meyer, G. (1891) “fiľ”, in Etymologisches Wörterbuch der albanesischen Sprache [Etymological Dictionary of the Albanian Language] (in German), Strasbourg: Karl J. Trübner, →DOI, page 104f.
  • Jungg, G. (1895) “fil”, in Fialuur i voghel sccȣp e ltinisct [Small Albanian–Italian dictionary], page 30

Etymology 2 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

fil m (plural filë) (nautical)

  1. gunwale

References edit

  • “fil i”, in FGJSSH: Fjalor i gjuhës së sotme shqipe [Dictionary of the modern Albanian language]‎[3] (in Albanian), 1980, page 470a

Azerbaijani edit

Other scripts
Cyrillic фил
Abjad فیل

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Arabic فِيل (fīl).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /fil/
  • (file)

Noun edit

fil (definite accusative fili, plural fillər)

  1. elephant
  2. (chess) bishop

Declension edit

    Declension of fil
singular plural
nominative fil
fillər
definite accusative fili
filləri
dative filə
fillərə
locative fildə
fillərdə
ablative fildən
fillərdən
definite genitive filin
fillərin
    Possessive forms of fil
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) filim fillərim
sənin (your) filin fillərin
onun (his/her/its) fili filləri
bizim (our) filimiz fillərimiz
sizin (your) filiniz filləriniz
onların (their) fili or filləri filləri
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) filimi fillərimi
sənin (your) filini fillərini
onun (his/her/its) filini fillərini
bizim (our) filimizi fillərimizi
sizin (your) filinizi fillərinizi
onların (their) filini or fillərini fillərini
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) filimə fillərimə
sənin (your) filinə fillərinə
onun (his/her/its) filinə fillərinə
bizim (our) filimizə fillərimizə
sizin (your) filinizə fillərinizə
onların (their) filinə or fillərinə fillərinə
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) filimdə fillərimdə
sənin (your) filində fillərində
onun (his/her/its) filində fillərində
bizim (our) filimizdə fillərimizdə
sizin (your) filinizdə fillərinizdə
onların (their) filində or fillərində fillərində
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) filimdən fillərimdən
sənin (your) filindən fillərindən
onun (his/her/its) filindən fillərindən
bizim (our) filimizdən fillərimizdən
sizin (your) filinizdən fillərinizdən
onların (their) filindən or fillərindən fillərindən
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) filimin fillərimin
sənin (your) filinin fillərinin
onun (his/her/its) filinin fillərinin
bizim (our) filimizin fillərimizin
sizin (your) filinizin fillərinizin
onların (their) filinin or fillərinin fillərinin

Descendants edit

  • Georgian: ფილ (pil)Ingilo

See also edit

Chess pieces in Azerbaijani · şahmat fiquru (layout · text)
           
şah vəzir top fil at piyada

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin fīlum, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰiH-(s-)lo-.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil m (plural fils)

  1. thread, wire
  2. (Internet) discussion thread
    Synonym: tema

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Crimean Tatar edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Arabic فِيل (fīl).

Noun edit

fil

  1. elephant
  2. (chess) bishop

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Dalmatian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin fīlum.

Noun edit

fil m

  1. thread, yarn, string

Related terms edit

Danish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Low German vīle, from Old Saxon fila, from Proto-Germanic *finhlō.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil c (singular definite filen, plural indefinite file)

  1. file (tool)
Declension edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English file (an aggregation of data) (1962).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil c (singular definite filen, plural indefinite filer)

  1. file (computer terminology)
Declension edit

Etymology 3 edit

See file.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

fil

  1. imperative of file

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French fil, from Latin fīlum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil m (plural fils)

  1. yarn, thread, wire
    ne tenir qu’à un fil
    to hang by a thread
  2. grain (of wood etc.)
  3. edge (of blade, razor etc.)

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • English: file (collection of papers) (see there for further descendants)

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Noun edit

fil m (apocopated)

  1. Apocopic form of filo

Judeo-Tat edit

Other scripts
Latin fil
Cyrillic фил (fil)
Hebrew פאִל (fil)

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil

  1. elephant

Maltese edit

Etymology edit

From Arabic فِيل (fīl).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil m (plural fjiel)

  1. (archaic) elephant
    Synonym: ljunfant

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

fil

  1. Alternative form of fille

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

fil

  1. Alternative form of fillen

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil f or m (definite singular fila or filen, indefinite plural filer, definite plural filene)

  1. A file.
  2. A hand tool used for removing sharp edges or for cutting, especially through metal.
  3. A section of roadway for a single line of vehicles, a lane.

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Swedish, from Old French. In the sense of a "computer file" it is borrowed from English file. Both the English and Swedish origins ultimately derive from Latin filum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil f (definite singular fila, indefinite plural filer, definite plural filene)

  1. (computing) a file
  2. (driving) a lane
Usage notes edit

Until 1983, this noun was also considered masculine.

Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Middle Low German.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil f (definite singular fila, indefinite plural filer, definite plural filene)

  1. a file (a hand tool)

Etymology 3 edit

Possibly shortened from Danish pamfilius. However, it might also be a native clipping of pamfil.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil f (definite singular fila, indefinite plural filer, definite plural filene)

  1. (card games) knave (esp. of clubs)

Etymology 4 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

fil

  1. imperative of file

References edit

  1. ^ “fil_1” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Anagrams edit

Occitan edit

Etymology edit

From Latin fīlum.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (Limousin) [ˈfjaʷ][1]
  • IPA(key): (Auvergnat) [ˈfjɑʷ]
  • IPA(key): (Gascon) [ˈhiu̯]
  • (file)
  • IPA(key): (East Languedocien) [ˈfiu̯]
  • IPA(key): (West Languedocien) [ˈfil]
  • (file)

Noun edit

fil m (plural fils)

  1. thread

References edit

  • Müller, Daniela. 2011. Developments of the lateral in Occitan dialects and their Romance and cross-linguistic context. Ph.D. Dissertation. University of Toulouse.
  1. ^ Müller 2011: 43. Likewise for the other four pronunciations.

Old French edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin fīlium, accusative singular of fīlius. The nominative form fiz, fils (whence modern French fils), derives from the Latin nominative.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil oblique singularm (oblique plural fiz or filz, nominative singular fiz or filz, nominative plural fil)

  1. son (male child)
Descendants edit
  • Bourguignon: fi
  • Walloon: fi

See filz for descendants from the nominative singular inflection.

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin fīlum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil oblique singularm (oblique plural fis, nominative singular fis, nominative plural fil)

  1. thread (fine strand of material)
Descendants edit

Old Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Originally ·fil (you see) and ·feil (one sees). From Proto-Celtic *weleti (to see), from Proto-Indo-European *wél-e-ti (see), compare Welsh gweled (to see). For the semantic development from "see" to "there is" compare Welsh dyma (there is) shortened from Middle Welsh wely di yma? (do you see?) or French voici (here is) from vois ci (see here).[1]

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

·fil

  1. present progressive conjunct of at·tá
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 19c20
      Má nudub·feil i n‑ellug coirp Críst, adib cland Abrache amal ṡodin, et it sib ata chomarpi Abracham.
      If you pl are in the union of the body of Christ, you are Abraham’s children in that case, and it is you who are Abraham’s heirs.
    • c. 845, St Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 26b7
      De dliguth trá inna n-il-toimdden sin, is de gaibthi “igitur”; quasi dixisset “Ní fail ní nád taí mo dligeth-sa fair i ndegaid na comroircnech.”
      Of the law then, of those many opinions, it is thereof that he recites “igitur”; as if he had said, “There is nothing which my law does not touch upon after the erroneous ones.

fil

  1. third-person singular present progressive relative of at·tá
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 77a15
      Is dúnn imchumurc fil isin chanóin fris·gair lessóm a n‑imchomarc n-ísiu .i. ne occideris .i. in ⸉n‑í⸊írr-siu .i. non. .i. nís·n‑ulemairbfe ci asid·roilliset.
      It is to the interrogation that is in the canon that this interrogation answers with him, i.e. ne occideris i.e. will you sg slay i.e. non i.e. you will not slay them all although they have deserved it.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 114b18
      nád fil nech con·gné fris ón acht Día
      that there is no one to help him but God

Usage notes edit

In the conjunct form, the logical subject appears in the accusative (or as an infixed object pronoun) in the oldest language. Examples:

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
fil ḟil fil
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ Schumacher, Stefan, Schulze-Thulin, Britta (2004) “*u̯el-e/o-”, in Die keltischen Primärverben: ein vergleichendes, etymologisches und morphologisches Lexikon [The Celtic Primary Verbs: A comparative, etymological and morphological lexicon] (Innsbrucker Beiträge zur Sprachwissenschaft; 110) (in German), Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, →ISBN, pages 672-75

Old Spanish edit

Alternative forms edit

  • phil (alternative spelling)

Etymology edit

Apocopic form of filo or fillo. Perhaps influenced by forms akin to Old Occitan fil.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil m (plural filos or fillos)

  1. Apocopic form of filo, son, child
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 14v:
      Entra a pharaon q̃ ẏo engrauiare so coraçõ. de los sieruos del criador. Por poner eſtas mis ſẽnales. ⁊ cuẽtalo delãte tos fiios al fil de tos fijos. Todo lo q̃ fiz en egipto en tus ſẽnales q̃ pus en ellos e ſabredes q̃ ẏo so el ſẽnor.
      “Go to Pharaoh, for I will harden his heart toward the servants of the Creator, that I may perform these My signs. And recount before your children and the child of your children all that I did in Egypt through your signs that I put among them, and you will know that I am the Lord.”

Old Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse fíll, from Arabic فِيل (fīl), from Middle Persian pyl (pīl), Akkadian 𒄠𒋛 (pīru).

Noun edit

fīl m

  1. elephant (Elephantidae)

Declension edit

Romagnol edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin fīlum (thread).

Pronunciation edit

  • (Central Romagnol): IPA(key): [ˈfiːl]

Noun edit

fil m (invariable) (Ravenna, Castel Bolognese)

  1. thread

Serbo-Croatian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish فیل (fil) (modern Turkish fil), from Arabic فِيل (fīl), from Middle Persian pyl (pīl), from Akkadian 𒄠𒋛 (pīru). Akin to fìldiš.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fȉl m (Cyrillic spelling фи̏л) or fȋl m (Cyrillic spelling фи̑л)

  1. (regional) elephant
    Synonym: slȍn

Declension edit

References edit

  • fil” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • Škaljić, Abdulah (1966) Turcizmi u srpskohrvatskom jeziku, Sarajevo: Svjetlost, page 283
  • fil”, in Речник српскохрватскога књижевног језика (in Serbo-Croatian), Друго фототипско издање edition, volume 6, Нови Сад, Загреб: Матица српска, Матица хрватска, 1967–1976, published 1990, page 668

Swedish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Low German vīle, from Old Saxon fila, from Proto-West Germanic *fį̄hlu, from Proto-Germanic *finhlō. Cognate with English file and German Feile.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil c

  1. a file (a tool)
Declension edit
Declension of fil 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fil filen filar filarna
Genitive fils filens filars filarnas
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “French file?”).

Row and lane (a row of vehicles) is one etymology, but as English file suggests computer file has a different etymology. However, the Swedish computer file is sometimes explained as a row of bytes, in attempt to shoehorn this new English loanword into the etymology of the existing word.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil c

  1. a row of objects; most commonly used about moving objects
  2. a section of roadway for a single line of vehicles, a lane
  3. (computing) file
Declension edit
Declension of fil 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fil filen filer filerna
Genitive fils filens filers filernas
Related terms edit
row
lane
computer file

Etymology 3 edit

Related to Icelandic þél (fermented milk), from Old Norse þéttr (dense, tight).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil c (uncountable)

  1. any product from a family of various (deliberately) soured milk products
  2. abbreviation for filmjölk; a particular kind of fil as above
Declension edit
Declension of fil 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative fil filen
Genitive fils filens
Related terms edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Tok Pisin edit

Etymology edit

From English field.

Noun edit

fil

  1. sportsfield

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkish فیل (fil), from Arabic فِيل (fīl), from Persian پیل (pil) (and from alternate Ottoman Turkish پیل (pil), directly from Persian پیل (pil)), from Akkadian 𒄠𒋛 (pīru), related to Egyptian ꜣbw (root of English elephant).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil (definite accusative fili, plural filler)

  1. elephant
  2. (chess) bishop

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative fil
Definite accusative fili
Singular Plural
Nominative fil filler
Definite accusative fili filleri
Dative file fillere
Locative filde fillerde
Ablative filden fillerden
Genitive filin fillerin
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular filim fillerim
2nd singular filin fillerin
3rd singular fili filleri
1st plural filimiz fillerimiz
2nd plural filiniz filleriniz
3rd plural filleri filleri
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular filimi fillerimi
2nd singular filini fillerini
3rd singular filini fillerini
1st plural filimizi fillerimizi
2nd plural filinizi fillerinizi
3rd plural fillerini fillerini
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular filime fillerime
2nd singular filine fillerine
3rd singular filine fillerine
1st plural filimize fillerimize
2nd plural filinize fillerinize
3rd plural fillerine fillerine
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular filimde fillerimde
2nd singular filinde fillerinde
3rd singular filinde fillerinde
1st plural filimizde fillerimizde
2nd plural filinizde fillerinizde
3rd plural fillerinde fillerinde
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular filimden fillerimden
2nd singular filinden fillerinden
3rd singular filinden fillerinden
1st plural filimizden fillerimizden
2nd plural filinizden fillerinizden
3rd plural fillerinden fillerinden
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular filimin fillerimin
2nd singular filinin fillerinin
3rd singular filinin fillerinin
1st plural filimizin fillerimizin
2nd plural filinizin fillerinizin
3rd plural fillerinin fillerinin
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular filim fillerim
2nd singular filsin fillersin
3rd singular fil
fildir
filler
fillerdir
1st plural filiz filleriz
2nd plural filsiniz fillersiniz
3rd plural filler fillerdir

References edit

  • fil”, in Turkish dictionaries, Türk Dil Kurumu

Uzbek edit

Other scripts
Cyrillic фил (fil)
Latin fil
Perso-Arabic فیل

Etymology edit

From Arabic فِيل (fīl).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil (plural fillar)

  1. elephant
  2. (chess) bishop

Declension edit

Volapük edit

Noun edit

fil (nominative plural fils)

  1. fire

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fil

  1. soft mutation of mil

Zazaki edit

Etymology edit

From Persian فیل (fil).

Noun edit

fil m

  1. elephant[1]

References edit

  1. ^ Faruk İremet (2000) ABC Zazaki/Elıfba Zazaki[1] (in Zazaki), ZazaPress, archived from the original on 2024-04-19, page 6