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See also: Firmament

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

English from the 13th century. Borrowed from Latin firmāmentum (from firmō (strengthen), from firmus (firm)), literally "that which strengthens or supports". The term is coined in the Vulgata in imitation of LXX στερέωμα (steréōma, firm or solid structure), which in turn translates Hebrew רקיע‎, strictly speaking a mistranslation, as the original Hebrew term meant "expanse", from the root רקע‎ "to spread out", which in Syriac had acquired the meaning "to make firm or solid".

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

firmament (plural firmaments)

  1. (uncountable) The vault of the heavens; the sky.
    • 1611, King James Version, Genesis 1:6–8:
      And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters. And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament: and it was so. And God called the firmament Heaven.
  2. (obsolete) basis.
  3. The field or sphere of an interest or activity.
    the international fashion firmament
  4. (archaic) In the geocentric Ptolemaic system, the eighth sphere, which carried the fixed stars.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin firmāmentum.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

firmament m (plural firmaments)

  1. firmament

Further readingEdit


NauruanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Firmament, from Middle High German firmament, from Late Latin firmāmentum.

NounEdit

firmament

  1. firmament

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin firmāmentum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

firmament m inan

  1. celestial sphere, heaven, sky
  2. (archaic) foundation.