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EnglishEdit

 
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A latch

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: lăch, IPA(key): /lætʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ætʃ

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lacchen (to seize, catch, grasp, verb), from Old English læċċan (to grasp, take hold of, catch, seize), from Proto-Germanic *lakjaną, *lakwijaną, *lakkijaną (to seize), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)leh₂g-, *(s)leh₂gʷ- (to take, seize). Cognate with Middle Dutch lakken (to grasp, catch).

VerbEdit

latch (third-person singular simple present latches, present participle latching, simple past and past participle latched)

  1. To close or lock as if with a latch.
  2. (transitive) To catch; lay hold of.
    • William Shakespeare, Macbeth
      Where hearing should not latch them.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English latche, lacche (a latch; a trap), from lacchen (to seize, catch, grasp), from Old English læċċan (to grasp, take hold of, catch, seize). See above for more.

NounEdit

latch (plural latches)

  1. A fastening for a door that has a bar that fits into a notch or slot, and is lifted by a lever or string from either side.
    • 1912: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes, Chapter 4
      The cleverly constructed latch which Clayton had made for the door had sprung as Kerchak passed out; nor could the apes find means of ingress through the heavily barred windows.
  2. A flip-flop electronic circuit
  3. (obsolete) A latching.
  4. (obsolete) A crossbow.
  5. (obsolete) That which fastens or holds; a lace; a snare.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of The Romaunt of the Rose to this entry?)
  6. A breastfeeding baby's connection to the breast.
  7. (databases) A lightweight lock to protect internal structures from being modified by multiple concurrent accesses.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Compare French lécher (to lick).

VerbEdit

latch (third-person singular simple present latches, present participle latching, simple past and past participle latched)

  1. (obsolete) To smear; to anoint.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)