trincar

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Probably an alteration of Old French tingler (to plug holes in timber with pieces of wood), from Old Norse tengja (to join together, connect).[1]

VerbEdit

trincar (first-person singular present trinco, past participle trincat)

  1. (transitive, nautical) to lash
ConjugationEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic.

VerbEdit

trincar (first-person singular present trinco, past participle trincat)

  1. (intransitive) to clink glasses with someone while drinking
ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German drinken (to drink).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trincar (first-person singular present trinco, first-person singular preterite trinquei, past participle trincado)

  1. to drink wine or liquor
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown. Perhaps from Old French tingler (to plug holes in timber with pieces of wood), from Old Norse tengja (to join together, connect).[1][2] Alternatively from estrincar (to tie), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *strangiz (string). Compare trinca (string).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trincar (first-person singular present trinco, first-person singular preterite trinquei, past participle trincado)

  1. to lash, tie, fasten
    Synonyms: amarrar, atar
  2. to catch, capture
    Synonyms: cachar, capturar, coller
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Occitan trencar, from Celtic. Doublet of trinchar.[3]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trincar (first-person singular present trinco, first-person singular preterite trinquei, past participle trincado)

  1. to bite, to squeeze, or cut with the teeth
    Synonyms: chanchar, trabar, triscar
ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • trinc” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • trincar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • trincar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • trincar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN
  2. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1983–1991) , “trincar”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos, →ISBN
  3. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1983–1991) , “tranzar”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos, →ISBN

InterlingueEdit

VerbEdit

trincar

  1. to drink (also about alcohol)

ConjugationEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Occitan trencar (to crack, break)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trincar (first-person singular present indicative trinco, past participle trincado)

  1. to crack (form cracks, break apart under pressure)
  2. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of trincar
  3. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of trincar
  4. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of trincar
  5. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of trincar

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Occitan trencar (to crack, break)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɾinˈkaɾ/, [t̪ɾĩŋ.ˈkaɾ]
  • Hyphenation: trin‧car

VerbEdit

trincar (first-person singular present trinco, first-person singular preterite trinqué, past participle trincado)

  1. (colloquial) to nick, rob
  2. (colloquial) to kidnap, nab
  3. (colloquial) to screw, shag
  4. (colloquial) to take out, do away with (kill)
  5. (colloquial) to get drunk
  6. (colloquial) to bust (a felon)

ConjugationEdit

  • c becomes qu before e.

Derived termsEdit


VenetianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German drinken. Compare Italian trincare.

VerbEdit

trincar

  1. to drink, especially to knock back a drink

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.