See also: métré, metré, mètre, -metre, and -mètre

English edit

 
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Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmiːtə/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmiːtəɹ/, [ˈmiːɾɚ]
  • Hyphenation: me‧tre
  • Rhymes: -iːtə(ɹ)

Etymology 1 edit

From French mètre, from Ancient Greek μέτρον (métron, measure, rule, length, size, poetic metre). Doublet of meter, metron, and mether.

Noun edit

metre (plural metres)

  1. The basic unit of length in the International System of Units (SI: Système International d'Unités), equal to the distance travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 seconds. The metre is equal to 39+47127 (approximately 39.37) imperial inches.
    • 1797, The Monthly magazine and British register, number 3:
      The measures of length above the metre are ten times ... greater than the metre.
    • 1873 April, The Young Englishwoman:
      A dress length of 8 metres of the best quality costs 58 francs.
    • 1928 April 15, The Observer:
      The 12-metre yachts ... can be sailed efficiently with four paid hands.
Usage notes edit
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit

(Metric scale)

Descendants edit
  • Tok Pisin: mita
  • Burmese: မီတာ (mita)
  • Chinese: 米突 (mǐtū, mǐtú)
  • Japanese: メーター (mētā)
  • Korean: 미터 (miteo) (South Korea), 메터 (meteo) (North Korea, China)
  • Maori: mita
  • Swahili: mita
  • Yoruba: mítà
Translations edit
See also edit
References edit

metre”, in Collins English Dictionary.

Further reading edit

Verb edit

metre (third-person singular simple present metres, present participle metring, simple past and past participle metred)

  1. (UK, rare) Alternative spelling of meter
Usage notes edit

The standard spelling of the verb meaning to measure is meter throughout the English-speaking world. The use of the spelling metre for this sense (outside music and poetry) is possibly a misspelling.

Etymology 2 edit

From Old English, from Latin metrum, from Ancient Greek μέτρον (métron, measure, rule, length, size, poetic metre).

Noun edit

metre (countable and uncountable, plural metres)

  1. (UK, Canada) The rhythm or measure in verse and musical composition.
Translations edit

Verb edit

metre (third-person singular simple present metres, present participle metring, simple past and past participle metred)

  1. (poetry, music) To put into metrical form.
See also edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from French mètre.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

metre m (plural metres)

  1. metre/meter (unit of measure, 100 cm)
  2. (poetry, music) metre/meter (the rhythm of a song or poem)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old Catalan metre, from Latin mittere. Compare Occitan metre, French mettre, Spanish meter.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

metre (first-person singular present meto, first-person singular preterite metí, past participle mes); root stress: (Central) /ɛ/; (Valencian) /e/; (Balearic) /ə/

  1. (transitive, archaic) to put, to place
    Synonym: posar
  2. (transitive, archaic) to set
Conjugation edit
Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Occitan edit

Etymology edit

From Old Occitan metre, from Latin mittere, present active infinitive of mittō. Attested from the 12th century.[1]

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Verb edit

metre

  1. (transitive) to put, to place

Conjugation edit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Diccionari General de la Lenga Occitana, L’Academia occitana – Consistòri del Gai Saber, 2008-2024, page 376.

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mittere.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

metre

  1. to put, to place

Conjugation edit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants edit

Turkish edit

 
metre

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkishمتره(metre), from French mètre.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

metre (definite accusative metreyi, plural metreler)

  1. metre, meter (unit of measure, 100 cm)
  2. rule, folding rule