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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested 1759, from Spanish mesa (table), from Latin mēnsa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mesa (plural mesas)

  1. Flat area of land or plateau higher than other land, with one or more clifflike edges.
    Coordinate term: butte
    Hyponyms: potrero, tuya
    A few more miles of hot sand and gravel and red stone brought us around a low mesa to the Little Colorado River.
    • 2013 November 27, John Grotzinger, “The world of Mars [print version: International Herald Tribune Magazine, 2013, p. 36]”, in The New York Times[1]:
      Those multitoned buttes and mesas [of the Grand Canyon], and that incandescent sequence of colorful bands that make one of the natural wonders of the world so grand, can also be found over 100 million miles away [on Mars].

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mēnsa.

NounEdit

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table

ReferencesEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈme.sa]
  • Hyphenation: me‧sa

NounEdit

mesa f (plural meses)

  1. table

ChamicuroEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

NounEdit

mesa

  1. table

ChavacanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish mesa (table), from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

NounEdit

mesa

  1. table

Eastern Huasteca NahuatlEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

NounEdit

mesa

  1. table

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa from Latin mēnsa.

NounEdit

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table
  2. all items set on a table for a meal
  3. board; directors of an organization

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

mēsa

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌴𐍃𐌰

HausaEdit

NounEdit

mēsā̀ f (plural mēsōshī, possessed form mēsàr̃)

  1. python
  2. rubber hose

Highland PopolucaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

NounEdit

mesa

  1. table

ReferencesEdit

  • Elson, Benjamin F.; Gutiérrez G., Donaciano (1999) Diccionario popoluca de la Sierra, Veracruz (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 41)‎[2] (in Spanish), Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., →ISBN, page 83

KitubaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish mesa or Portuguese mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

NounEdit

mesa

  1. table

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From mēnsa, which underwent elision. This term is attested in the Appendix Probi[1], a compilation of common mistakes written in the Late Antiquity.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mēsa f (genitive mēsae); first declension

  1. (Vulgar Latin) Alternative form of mēnsa ("table").
    • 3rd–4th century CE, Appendix Probi:
      mēnsa non mēsa
      [Use] mēnsa, not mēsa.

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mēsa mēsae
Genitive mēsae mēsārum
Dative mēsae mēsīs
Accusative mēsam mēsās
Ablative mēsā mēsīs
Vocative mēsa mēsae

First declension.

Italo-Western declension of *mēsa
Number Singular Plural
nominative *mẹ́sa *mẹ́sę
genitive *mẹ́sę *mẹsárọ
dative *mẹ́sę *mẹ́sis
accusative-ablative *mẹ́sã *mẹ́sas
Eastern declension of *mēsa
Number Singular Plural
nominative *mẹ́sa *mẹ́sę
genitive *mẹ́sę *mẹsáru
dative *mẹ́sę *mẹ́sis
accusative-ablative *mẹ́sã *mẹ́sas
Sardinian declension of *mēsa
Number Singular Plural
nominative *mésa *mésę
genitive *mésę *mesáru
dative *mésę *mésis
accusative-ablative *mésã *mésas

DescendantsEdit

  • Aromanian: measã
  • Asturian: mesa
  • Catalan: mesa
  • Dalmatian: maisa
  • French: moise
  • Gothic: 𐌼𐌴𐍃 (mēs)
  • Indonesian: meja
  • Irish: mias
  • Malay: meja

ReferencesEdit


LatvianEdit

NounEdit

mesa f (4 declension)

  1. (Christianity) mass

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mesa m

  1. ram

DeclensionEdit


PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese mesa and Spanish mesa and Kabuverdianu meza.

NounEdit

mesa

  1. table

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
 
mesa

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mesa (table), from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa (table).

Cognate with Galician mesa, Spanish mesa, French moise, Italian mensa and Romanian masă.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table (item of furniture)
    José, põe a mesa, por favor.
    José, please set the table.
    • 2015, Neil Gaiman, Os filhos de Anansi, Editora Intrinseca, →ISBN, page 6:
      Cumprimentou-as tocando a aba do chapéu — pois ele usava chapéu, um fedora verde imaculado, além de luvas cor de lima —, e em seguida caminhou até a mesa onde estavam as mulheres, que deram risada.
      He greeted them by touching the brim of his hat – for he wore a hat, an immaculate green fedora, and lime-colored gloves – and then walked to the table where the women were, who gave a laugh.
  2. meal, food
    Portugal tem boa mesa e bom vinho.
    Portugal has good food and good wine.
  3. (geography) mesa
  4. board (committee)

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:mesa.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • mesa” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmesa/
  • Hyphenation: me‧sa

NounEdit

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table
  2. mesa

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • O'odham: miːsa
  • Zoogocho Zapotec: mes

TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish mesa (table), from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɛsa/
  • Hyphenation: me‧sa

NounEdit

mesa

  1. table

SynonymsEdit

  • lamesa (often used interchangeably with mesa)

Zacatlán-Ahuacatlán-Tepetzintla NahuatlEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa. Compare Highland Puebla Nahuatl me̱saj, Tetelcingo Nahuatl miesa.

NounEdit

mesa

  1. Table.

ReferencesEdit

  • Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C. (2006), “Tlen ticuih itich in cocina”, in Pequeño diccionario ilustrado: Náhuatl de los municipios de Zacatlán, Tepetzintla y Ahuacatlán[3], segunda edición edition, Tlalpan, D.F. México: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 16