See also: Muck

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mok, muk, from Old English moc (found in hlōsmoc) and also perhaps Old Norse myki, mykr (dung) (compare Icelandic mykja), from Proto-Germanic *mukī (dung; manure), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)mewg-, *mewk- (slick, slippery) (compare Welsh mign (swamp), Latin mūcus (snot), mucere (to be moldy or musty), Latvian mukls (swampy), Albanian myk (mould), Ancient Greek mýxa 'mucus, lamp wick', mýkes 'fungus'), from *(s)mewg, mewk 'to slip'. More at meek.

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /mʌk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌk

NounEdit

muck (usually uncountable, plural mucks)

  1. (slimy) mud, sludge.
    The car was covered in muck from the rally race.
    I need to clean the muck off my shirt.
  2. Soft (or slimy) manure.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  3. Anything filthy or vile. Dirt; something that makes another thing dirty.
    What's that green muck on the floor?
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  4. grub, slop, swill
  5. (obsolete, derogatory) money
    • (Can we date this quote by Beaumont and Fletcher and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      the fatal muck we quarrelled for
  6. (poker) The pile of discarded cards.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

muck (third-person singular simple present mucks, present participle mucking, simple past and past participle mucked)

  1. To shovel muck.
    We need to muck the stable before it gets too thick.
  2. To manure with muck.
  3. To do a dirty job.
  4. (poker, colloquial) To pass, to fold without showing one's cards, often done when a better hand has already been revealed.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit


ManxEdit

NounEdit

muck f (genitive singular muickey or muigey, plural mucyn or muckyn or muick)

  1. Alternative form of muc

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
muck vuck unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably of North Germanic origin; compare Old Norse myki, mykr ‘dung’.

NounEdit

muck (uncountable)

  1. dung, manure, muck

VerbEdit

muck (third-person singular present mucks, present participle muckin, past muckit, past participle muckit)

  1. To dirty, foul

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From mucka (to protest).

NounEdit

muck n (indeclinable)

  1. (colloquial) an objection, a protest
  2. (colloquial, bleached) discernable part of an utterance

Usage notesEdit

  • The second sense is usually used in the expression inte höra/begripa ett muck (”not hear/understand a thing”).

SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Tavringer Romani muck (free), from Romani muk- (to let, to release, to leave). Related to Sanskrit मुञ्चति (muñcati, to release, to free, to let go).

NounEdit

muck c

  1. (military, colloquial) demobilization

DeclensionEdit

Declension of muck 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative muck mucken
Genitive mucks muckens

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • muck in Svensk ordbok (SO)
  • “muck” in Gerd Carling, Romani i svenskan: Storstadsslang och standardspråk, Stockholm: Carlsson, 2005, →ISBN, page 92.



TurkishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

muck

  1. Kiss sound, mwah