Translingual edit

Symbol edit

mo

  1. (international standards, obsolete) Former ISO 639-1 language code for Moldovan.

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /məʊ/
  • (US) enPR: , IPA(key): /moʊ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English mo, from Old English , from Proto-Germanic *maiz, from a comparative form of Proto-Indo-European *meh₂-. Cognate with Swedish mer, Danish mer; and with Irish , Albanian . See also more, most.

Adverb edit

mo (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) To a greater degree.
  2. (now dialectal) Further, longer.

Adjective edit

mo (not comparable)

  1. (archaic, dialectal) Greater in amount, quantity, or number (of discrete objects, as opposed to more, which was applied to substances)

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

mo (plural mos)

  1. Abbreviation of month.
    Alternative forms: m, mo.

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

mo (uncountable)

  1. (colloquial) Clipping of moment.
    Hang on a mo!

Etymology 4 edit

Clipping of homo, itself a short form of homosexual.

Noun edit

mo (plural mos)

  1. (slang) A homosexual.

Etymology 5 edit

Only coincidentally similar to sense 1 above. Compare fo' (for; four), ho (whore).

Adjective edit

mo (not comparable)

  1. (dialectal, African-American Vernacular) Alternative form of mo' (more)
    Yo, you got mo chips?

Etymology 6 edit

Short for moustache.

Noun edit

mo (plural mos)

  1. (Australia, New Zealand, colloquial) A moustache.

Etymology 7 edit

Clipping.

Noun edit

mo (plural mos)

  1. (prison slang) A molester.
    • 2018, James Kühnel, Carceration State:
      The Idaho prison is full of cho-mos (child molesters), mos (molesters), and all types of sexual predators that have engaged in some type of abnormal sexual acts.
Related terms edit

Etymology 8 edit

Clipping.

Noun edit

mo (plural mos)

  1. (slang) A moron.
    • 1997, “Detox”, in City, performed by Strapping Young Lad:
      Hey, you mo! Hey, you mo! Hey, you mo! Hey, you mo!

Etymology 9 edit

From mil, by analogy with do and gro.

Numeral edit

mo

  1. The cardinal number occurring after el gro el do el (↋↋↋) and before mo one (1001) in a duodecimal system. Written 1000, decimal value 1728.

See also edit

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Abinomn edit

Noun edit

mo

  1. (anatomy) stomach

Adangme edit

Pronoun edit

mo

  1. you
    I suɔ mo.
    I love you.

Akan edit

Pronoun edit

mo

  1. ye, you (plural)

Albanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Albanian *mē, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₁ (a prohibitive particle).

Particle edit

mo (masculine adjectival i mo, feminine singular e mo, masculine plural mo, feminine plural moa)

  1. don't

Alemannic German edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German man, from Old High German man, from Proto-Germanic *mann-. Cognate with German Mann, Dutch man, English man, Icelandic maður, Swedish man, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌽𐌽𐌰 (manna).

Noun edit

mo m (Carcoforo)

  1. man
  2. husband

References edit

Amanab edit

Noun edit

mo

  1. speech, language, word

Angguruk Yali edit

Noun edit

mo

  1. mountain

References edit

Antillean Creole edit

Etymology edit

From French mot (word).

Noun edit

mo

  1. word

Bikol Central edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mo

  1. second person singular possessive adjective; your

Dongxiang edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Mongolic *mör (trail, path), compare Mongolian мөр (mör, road, path).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mo

  1. road, path
    nie fade bi zhin mo jiere yawuzhi saozhi wo.
    one time I was walking on the road.

Esperanto edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mo (accusative singular mo-on, plural mo-oj, accusative plural mo-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M.

See also edit

Galician edit

Pronunciation edit

Contraction edit

mo (plural mos, feminine singular ma, feminine plural mas)

  1. Contraction of me o.
    Damo!Give it to me!

Haitian Creole edit

Etymology edit

From French mot (word).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mo

  1. word

Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

  • m’ (used before vowel sounds)

Etymology edit

From Old Irish mo, mu; see there for more.

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

mo (triggers lenition)

  1. my
    mo bhádmy boat
    mo mháthairmy mother
  2. me (direct object pronoun before verbal noun)
    Tá sé ag mo bhualadhHe is hitting me

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 88
  2. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 9

Further reading edit

  • Ó Dónaill, Niall (1977) “mo”, in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, Dublin: An Gúm, →ISBN
  • Entries containing “mo” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “mo” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Italian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mox (soon) or Latin modo (recently, just now).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmo/*
  • Rhymes: -o
  • Hyphenation:

Adverb edit

mo (central-southern Italy or archaic)

  1. present. now
    Synonyms: ora, adesso
    E mo che voi?
    What do you want now?
    Mo so' cazzi tua.
    It's your business now.
  2. near future. soon, in a moment
    Synonyms: subito, tra poco
    E n'attimo! Mo lo faccio!
    Wait a second! I'll do it in a moment!
    Aspetta! Mo arivo!
    Wait! I'm coming!
    Mo te faccio vedé.
    I'll show you.
  3. near past. recently, just now
    Synonyms: appena, poco fa
    Ce so' stato mo.
    I've been there just now.
  4. (originally ironic) See da mo.
  5. (repeated) See mo mo.

Further reading edit

  • mo in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • mo in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

mo

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Kalasha edit

Etymology edit

From Sanskrit मा (mā́), from Proto-Indo-European *meh₁ (prohibitive particle). Cognate with Hindi मत (mat), Persian مـ (ma-), Albanian mo.

Particle edit

mo

  1. do not, don't (prohibitive particle)

Kapampangan edit

Etymology edit

From mu +‎ ya. Compare Japanese (mo).

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

mo

  1. although; even if; even though
    Synonyms: agyang, man
  2. also; no matter what
    Synonyms: din, pati, agyaman

Derived terms edit

Latin edit

 
Reverse of a silver penny of Æthelstan of England with the inscription REGNALD MO EFORƿIC ("Regnald Moneyer at York")

Noun edit

mo

  1. (Medieval Latin, historical) Abbreviation of monētārius (moneyer, minter) in its various forms.

Lolopo edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Loloish *C-ma³ (Bradley), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan. Cognate with Burmese -မ (-ma.).

Suffix edit

mo

  1. (Yao'an) female
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Loloish *ma¹ (Bradley). Cognate with Nuosu (ma), Naxi meel.

Noun edit

mo 

  1. (Yao'an) bamboo

Louisiana Creole edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “Probably inherited from French "moi/mon".”)

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

mo (first person singular, plural nouzòt, nou, no, objective , possessive determiner , possessive pronoun mokin, mochin)

  1. I (first person singular nominative (subject) pronoun)
    Mo té manké twa.
    I missed you.

Derived terms edit

  • (prevocalic) m'

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

mo (mo5mo0, Zhuyin ˙ㄇㄛ)

  1. Hanyu Pinyin reading of , , ,

mo

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Matlatzinca edit

Noun edit

mo

  1. foot

References edit

  • Roberto Escalante Hernández, Marciano Hernández, Matlatzinca de San Francisco Oxtotilpan, Estado de México (1999)

Mauritian Creole edit

Etymology 1 edit

From French moi (me).

Pronoun edit

mo (objective mwa)

  1. I (first-person singular nominative personal pronoun)
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From French mot (word).

Noun edit

mo

  1. word

Alternative spelling: mot.

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English , from Proto-Germanic *maiz, from a comparative form of Proto-Indo-European *meh₂-.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mo

  1. more numerous; larger in amount
  2. greater in quantity or intensity
  3. additional, further, other (persons or things in addition to those mentioned)
  4. higher in social status

Adverb edit

mo

  1. to a greater degree; more
  2. longer, again, any more
  3. besides, also, further, else

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • English: mo

References edit

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mollis.

Adjective edit

mo m

  1. (Jersey) soft

Derived terms edit

Northern Sami edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈmoː/

Adverb edit

  1. how

Further reading edit

  • Koponen, Eino, Ruppel, Klaas, Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002–2008), Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology 1 edit

Believed to be from the noun moe.

Adjective edit

mo (neuter singular mo or mott, definite singular and plural mo or moe)

  1. close, sultry

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse moðr.

Alternative forms edit

Adjective edit

mo (neuter singular mo, definite singular and plural mo or moe)

  1. tired, weary

Etymology 3 edit

From Old Norse mór (moor).

Noun edit

mo m (definite singular moen, indefinite plural moer, definite plural moene)

  1. moor, heath
  2. (military) drill ground

Etymology 4 edit

From Old Norse moð.

Noun edit

mo n (definite singular moet, indefinite plural mo, definite plural moa or moene)

  1. dust (e.g. sawdust)
  2. chaff (e.g. from hay)

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse mór (moor), from Proto-Germanic *mōraz.

Noun edit

mo m (definite singular moen, indefinite plural moar, definite plural moane)

  1. moor, heath
  2. (military) drill ground

Etymology 2 edit

Perhaps from the noun moe m.

Adjective edit

mo (neuter singular mo or mott, definite singular and plural mo or moe)

  1. close, sultry

Etymology 3 edit

From Old Norse móðr, from Proto-Germanic *mōdaz.

Alternative forms edit

  • mod (alternative spelling)

Adjective edit

mo (neuter singular mo, definite singular and plural mo or moe)

  1. tired, weary

Etymology 4 edit

From Old Norse moð.

Alternative forms edit

  • (alternative spelling)

Noun edit

mo n (definite singular moet, indefinite plural mo, definite plural moa)

  1. dust (e.g. sawdust)
  2. chaff (e.g. from hay)

Etymology 5 edit

From German, originally moder.

Adverb edit

mo

  1. Used as an intensifier about loneliness
    Synonym: mutters

Etymology 6 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

mo

  1. imperative of moa

References edit

Anagrams edit

Old Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

  • mu
  • m’ (used before vowel sounds)

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *mene, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁mene, genitive of *éǵh₂. The Goidelic forms came from *mene being remodelled into *mowe by analogy with *towe (your) (whence do (your)).[1]

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

mo (triggers lenition)

  1. my
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 10d23
      Mad ar lóg pridcha-sa, .i. ar m’étiuth et mo thoschith, ním·bia fochricc dar hési mo precepte.
      If I preach for pay, that is, for my clothing and my sustenance, I shall not have a reward for my teaching.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 73d1
      Fu·lilsain-se .i. matis mu námait duda·gnetis ⁊ maniptis mu chara⟨i⟩t duda·gnetis.
      I would have endured, i.e. if it had been my enemies who did them and if it had not been my friends who did them.

Descendants edit

  • Irish: mo
  • Scottish Gaelic: mo
  • Manx: my

References edit

  1. ^ Schrijver, Peter C. H. (1995) Studies in British Celtic historical phonology (Leiden studies in Indo-European; 5), Amsterdam, Atlanta: Rodopi, page 333

Further reading edit

Old Occitan edit

Pronoun edit

mo m (feminine ma, masculine plural mos)

  1. my (possessive; belong to 'me')

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: mo

Contraction edit

mo (feminine ma)

  1. Contraction of me o (him/it to me).

Réunion Creole French edit

Etymology edit

From French mot (word).

Noun edit

mo

  1. word

Samoan edit

Preposition edit

mo

  1. for

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish mo. Cognates include Irish mo.

Determiner edit

mo (triggers lenition)

  1. my

See also edit

References edit

Swahili edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

-mo

  1. present stem of -wamo (to be (inside there))
    wamothey are inside

See also edit

  • -mo: verbal affix
  • -wapo (“to be (at a definite place)”)
  • -wako (“to be (at an indefinite place)”)

Swedish edit

Noun edit

mo c

  1. sandy soil
  2. a sandy field, a moor, a heath

Declension edit

Declension of mo 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mo mon moar moarna
Genitive mos mons moars moarnas

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Tagalog edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mo (Baybayin spelling ᜋᜓ)

  1. second person singular possessive adjective; your

See also edit

Tuvaluan edit

Preposition edit

mo

  1. for

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mo (𥷺, 𧄲)

  1. spathe of the areca tree

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

Reduced form of ddim o (not of, nothing of).

Pronunciation edit

Particle edit

mo (causes soft mutation)

  1. (colloquial) negative particle used when immediately preceding the definite article or a definite noun phrase
    Fwytais i mo'r moron.I didn't eat the carrots.
    Wela i mo'r ffilm 'na.I will not see that film.
    Chlywoch chi mo Owain.You didn't hear Owain.
    Leician nhw mo wraig y dyn.They wouldn't like the man's wife.

Usage notes edit

Because this form is used only when directly in front of a definite object, it only appears in the (non-periphrastic) preterite, future and conditional tenses.

In front of a pronoun, mo has personal forms the same as the preposition o:

See also edit

  • dim, ddim (negative particle used in all other situations)

Mutation edit

Does not mutate.

West Makian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

mo

  1. (transitive) to swallow
  2. (transitive) to slurp up, to suck up
Conjugation edit
Conjugation of mo (action verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person tomo momo amo
2nd person nomo fomo
3rd person inanimate imo domo
animate
imperative nomo, mo fomo, mo

Etymology 2 edit

For the semantic development of the interjection, compare Spanish ya (already; come on!).

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

mo

  1. Alternative form of omo (already)

Interjection edit

mo

  1. come!
  2. come on!

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

mo

  1. (stative) alternative form of mu (ripe)
Conjugation edit
Conjugation of mo (stative verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person timo mimo amo
2nd person nimo fimo
3rd person inanimate imo dimo
animate mamo
imperative —, mo —, mo

References edit

  • James Collins (1982) Further Notes Towards a West Makian Vocabulary[2], Pacific linguistics
  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[3], Pacific linguistics

Yao edit

Yao cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : mo

Etymology edit

Cognates include Swahili moja.

Numeral edit

mo

  1. one

Usage notes edit

This number follows a noun and takes the noun class characteristic prefix, e.g. libweta limo (one box). See the Yao language article on Wikipedia for details on noun class prefixes.

Yoruba edit

Alternative forms edit

  • mi (used in a negative sentence, or generally in some dialects)
  • n (used in negative or future sentences, or with )

Pronoun edit

mo

  1. I (first-person singular personal pronoun)

See also edit