Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English, from Old English , from Proto-Germanic *maiz, from a comparative form of Proto-Indo-European *mə-. Cognate with Swedish mer, Danish mer; and with Irish , Albanian . See also more, most.

AdverbEdit

mo ‎(not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) To a greater degree.
  2. (now dialectal) Further, longer.

AdjectiveEdit

mo ‎(not comparable)

  1. (archaic, dialectal) Greater in amount, quantity, or number (of discrete objects, as opposed to more, which was applied to substances)
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew XXII:
      Nether durste eny man from that daye forth axe hym eny moo questions.
    • c. 1380, William Langland, Piers Plowman
      With that ran there a route of ratones at ones,
      And smale mys myd hem, mo then a thousande

Etymology 2Edit

Abbreviation of month.

NounEdit

mo ‎(plural mos)

  1. month

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of moment.

NounEdit

mo ‎(uncountable)

  1. (colloquial) moment
    Hang on a mo!

Etymology 4Edit

Clipping of homo, itself a short form of homosexual.

NounEdit

mo ‎(plural mos)

  1. (slang) a homosexual

Etymology 5Edit

Clipping of more, non-rhotic dialects, notably African American Vernacular English. Compare fo'(for; four), ho(whore).

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mo ‎(not comparable)

  1. (dialectal) more
    Yo, you got mo chips?

Etymology 6Edit

moustache + -o

NounEdit

mo ‎(plural mos)

  1. (Australia, New Zealand, colloquial) A moustache

AnagramsEdit


AdangmeEdit

PronounEdit

mo

  1. you
    I suɔ mo.
    I love you.

AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *mē, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₁, a prohibitive particle.

ParticleEdit

mo ‎(masculine adjectival i mo, feminine singular e mo, masculine plural mo, feminine plural moa)

  1. don't

Alternative formsEdit


AmanabEdit

Antillean CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mot(word)

NounEdit

mo

  1. word

DongxiangEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Mongolic *mör(trail, path), compare Mongolian мөр(mör, road, path).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mo

  1. road, path

EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

mo ‎(accusative singular mo-on, plural mo-oj, accusative plural mo-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M/m.

See alsoEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mot(word)

NounEdit

mo

  1. word

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

mo ‎(triggers lenition of a following consonant)

  1. my
    mo bhád‎ ― my boat
    mo mháthair‎ ― my mother
  2. me (direct object pronoun before verbal noun)
    Tá sé ag mo bhualadh‎ ― He is hitting me

Related termsEdit

  • m’ (form used before a vowel or lenited f)

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

AdverbEdit

mo

  1. Alternative spelling of mo'

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

mo

  1. Romaji transcription of
  2. Romaji transcription of

LojbanEdit

CmavoEdit

mo

  1. (interrogative, pro-bridi) used as the selbri, the word indicates asking for the selbri.
    do mo
    What are you? / What are you doing?
    le cukta cu mo le karce
    How are the book and the car related?

See alsoEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

mo

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mauritian CreoleEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French moi(me)

PronounEdit

mo ‎(objective mwa)

  1. I (first-person singular nominative personal pronoun)
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French mot(word)

NounEdit

mo

  1. word

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mollis.

AdjectiveEdit

mo m

  1. (Jersey) soft

Derived termsEdit


Northern SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

AdverbEdit

mo

  1. how

NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mór(moor)

NounEdit

mo

  1. moor
  2. heath

InflectionEdit

NB: This section is incomplete, as there are four more meanings and different etymons. See Bokmåls- og nynorskordboka, Universitetet i Oslo.


Old ProvençalEdit

PronounEdit

mo m ‎(feminine ma, masculine plural mos)

  1. my (possessive; belong to 'me')

Réunion Creole FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mot(word)

NounEdit

mo

  1. word

SamoanEdit

PrepositionEdit

mo

  1. for

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old Irish mo, mu

PronounEdit

mo

  1. my, mine

Usage notesEdit

  • Lenites the following word.
    mo + baile = mo bhaile (my town)
  • Takes the form m' before words beginning with a vowel: m' ainm (my name).

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

mo c

  1. sandy soil
  2. a sandy field, a moor, a heath

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of mo 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mo mon moar moarna
Genitive mos mons moars moarnas

TagalogEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mo

  1. second person singular possessive adjective; your

TuvaluanEdit

PrepositionEdit

mo

  1. for