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See also: mōdo, mōdõ, and mödo

Contents

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmodo/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -odo

NounEdit

modo (accusative singular modon, plural modoj, accusative plural modojn)

  1. (grammar) mood
  2. fashion, style

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin modus

NounEdit

modo m (plural modos)

  1. mode, manner

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Esperanto modo (mood), from English mode, French mode, German Modus, Italian modo, Russian мо́да (móda), Spanish modo, all ultimately from Latin modus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmo.do/, /ˈmɔ.dɔ/

NounEdit

modo (plural modi)

  1. mode (a passing usage which depends upon taste, caprice)
  2. fashion, style
  3. (grammar) mood (indicative, imperative, etc.)
  4. (philosophy, music) mode
  5. (law) modus

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin modus, from Proto-Indo-European *modós, derived from the root *med- (to measure).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔ.do/, [ˈmɔːd̪o]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔdo
  • Hyphenation: mò‧do

NounEdit

modo m (plural modi)

  1. manner, way
  2. (grammar) mood
  3. (music) style, manner

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LashiEdit

LatinEdit

AdverbEdit

modo

  1. just, only
    Tunc modo edere volēbat.Just then he only wanted to eat.
  2. recently, just now
    Latrōcinium modo factum est.A robbery just took place.
  3. presently

Usage notesEdit

modo ... modoat one time ... at another

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

modō m

  1. dative singular of modus
  2. ablative singular of modus

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • modo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • modo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • modo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • modo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to translate freely: his fere verbis, hoc fere modo convertere, transferre
    • (ambiguous) with no moderation: sine modo; nullo modo adhibito
    • (ambiguous) to flee like deer, sheep: pecorum modo fugere (Liv. 40. 27)

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin modus (measure; manner), from Proto-Indo-European *med- (to measure).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

modo m (plural modos)

  1. mode; way; method (method or manner of doing something)
    Synonyms: jeito, maneira, método, moda
  2. mode; state; condition
    Synonym: condição, estado
  3. (grammar) mood
  4. (music) mode (one of several ancient scales)

HyponymsEdit

Related termsEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *mǫdo.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mòːdɔ/, /móːdɔ/

NounEdit

mọ̄do n

  1. testicle

InflectionEdit

Neuter, hard
nom. sing. módo
gen. sing. móda
singular dual plural
nominative módo módi móda
accusative módo módi móda
genitive móda mód mód
dative módu módoma módom
locative módu módih módih
instrumental módom módoma módi

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin modus

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

modo m (plural modos)

  1. way
    a mi modo de ver
    the way I see it
  2. (grammar) mood
  3. (following "ni") (no) matter; (there is no) solution (but oh well)
    "Ni modo, es un trabajo sucio pero alguien tiene que hacerlo."
    "Oh well, it's a dirty job but somebody has to do it."

HyponymsEdit

See alsoEdit