See also: piné

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /paɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪn

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English pyne, from Latin pīnus, from Proto-Indo-European *peyH- (sap, juice). Cognate with Sanskrit पितु (pitu, sap, juice, resin).

NounEdit

pine (countable and uncountable, plural pines)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Any coniferous tree of the genus Pinus.
    Synonym: pine tree
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, in The China Governess[1]:
      Sepia Delft tiles surrounded the fireplace, their crudely drawn Biblical scenes in faded cyclamen blending with the pinkish pine, while above them, instead of a mantelshelf, there was an archway high enough to form a balcony with slender balusters and a tapestry-hung wall behind.
    The northern slopes were covered mainly in pine.
  2. (countable) Any tree (usually coniferous) which resembles a member of this genus in some respect.
  3. (uncountable) The wood of this tree.
    Synonym: pinewood
  4. (archaic except South Africa) A pineapple.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English pine, pyne, from Old English *pīn (pain), from Proto-Germanic *pīnō (pain, torment, torture), possibly from Latin poena (punishment), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty, fine, bloodmoney). Cognate to pain.

Entered Germanic with Christianity; cognate to Middle Dutch pinen, Old High German pīnōn, Old Norse pína.[1]

NounEdit

pine (plural pines)

  1. (archaic) A painful longing.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English pinen, from Old English pīnian (to torment), from Proto-Germanic *pīnōną, from Proto-Germanic *pīnō (pain, torment, torture), from the noun (see above). Cognate with German peinigen (to torment, torture), Icelandic pína (to torment).

VerbEdit

pine (third-person singular simple present pines, present participle pining, simple past and past participle pined)

  1. To languish; to lose flesh or wear away through distress.
    Synonyms: languish, droop
    • 170?, Thomas Tickell, To a Lady; With a Present of Flowers:
      This night shall see the gaudy wreath decline, The roses wither and the lilies pine.
    • 1855, John Sullivan Dwight (translator), “Oh Holy Night”, as printed in 1871, Adolphe-Charles Adam (music), “Cantique de Noël”, G. Schirmer (New York), originally by Placide Cappeau de Roquemaure, 1847
      Long lay the world in sin and error pining / Till He appear’d and the soul felt its worth
    • 1994, Walter Dean Myers, The Glory Field[2], →ISBN, page 29:
      The way the story went was that the man's foot healed up all right but that he just pined away.
  2. (intransitive) To long, to yearn so much that it causes suffering.
    Synonyms: long, yearn
    Laura was pining for Bill all the time he was gone.
    • 1969 December 7, Michael Palin and John Cleese as shopkeeper and Mr Praline, “Full Frontal Nudity, Dead Parrot sketch”, in Monty Python's Flying Circus:
      Praline: "That parrot is definitely deceased. And when I bought it not half an hour ago you assured me that its lack of movement was due to it being tired and shagged out after a long squawk."
      Shopkeeper: "It's probably pining for the fiords."
      Praline: "Pining for the fiords, what kind of talk is that?"
    • 2016 August 14, Ross Douthat, “A Playboy for President”, in The New York Times[3]:
      Ten years ago, liberals pined for a post-religious right, a different culture war. Be careful what you wish for.
    • 2019 August 14, A. A. Dowd, “Good Boys puts a tween spin on the R-rated teen comedy, to mostly funny effect”, in The A.V. Club[4]:
      Of the group, Max (Room’s Jacob Tremblay) is the most nominally mature, at least biologically speaking; unlike his childhood companions, he’s entered the early throes of puberty, and spends a lot of his waking hours pining, rather chastely, for a classmate (Millie Davis).
  3. (transitive) To grieve or mourn for.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)
  4. (transitive) To inflict pain upon; to torment.
    Synonyms: torment, torture, afflict
    • (Can we date this quote by Bishop Hall and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      One is pined in prison, another tortured on the rack.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

  •   pine on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • pine in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.
  • pine at OneLook Dictionary Search

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ pine” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

AnagramsEdit


BihEdit

NounEdit

pine

  1. woman, girl

Further readingEdit

  • Tam Thi Min Nguyen, A grammar of Bih (2013)

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Via Old Saxon pīna from Medieval Latin pēna (punishment in hell), from Latin poena (punishment), a loan from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty, fine, bloodmoney).

NounEdit

pine c (singular definite pinen, plural indefinite piner)

  1. torment
  2. (in compounds) ache
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German pīnen, derived from the noun.

VerbEdit

pine (imperative pin, infinitive at pine, present tense piner, past tense pinte, perfect tense er/har pint)

  1. torment
  2. torture
SynonymsEdit

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pine f (plural pines)

  1. (slang) nob, penis

VerbEdit

pine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of piner
  2. third-person singular present indicative of piner
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of piner
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of piner
  5. second-person singular imperative of piner

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

pine f

  1. plural of pina

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

pīne

  1. vocative singular of pīnus

MaoriEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably English pin

NounEdit

pine

  1. pin, tack, brooch

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse pína, from Latin poena

NounEdit

pine f or m (definite singular pina or pinen, indefinite plural piner, definite plural pinene)

  1. pain, torment, torture

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

pine (present tense piner, past tense pinte, past participle pint)

  1. to torment, to torture

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse pína, from Latin poena

NounEdit

pine f (definite singular pina, indefinite plural piner, definite plural pinene)

  1. pain, torment, torture

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

pine (present tense piner, past tense pinte, past participle pint, passive infinitive pinast, present participle pinande, imperative pin)

  1. to torment, to torture

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

pine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of pinar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of pinar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of pinar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of pinar

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

pine c (plural pinen, diminutive pyntsje)

  1. pain, ache

Further readingEdit

  • pine”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

ZazakiEdit

NounEdit

pine

  1. patch
  2. (computing) patch