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See also: Pry, PRY, and prý

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English pryen, prien (to look closely, peer into, pry, spy), from Old English *prīwan, *prēowian (to look narrowly, to squint at), attested by Old English beprīwan, beprēwan (to wink). Akin to Old English *prēowot (closing of the eyes), attested only in combination, compare prēowthwīl (blink or twinkling of an eye, moment), Old English princ (a wink). More at prink.

VerbEdit

pry (third-person singular simple present pries, present participle prying, simple past and past participle pried)

  1. (intransitive) To look where one is not welcome; to be nosy.
  2. (intransitive) To look closely and curiously at (something closed or not public).
    • Shakespeare
      Watch thou and wake when others be asleep, / To pry into the secrets of the state.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

pry

  1. The act of prying.
  2. An excessively inquisitive person.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

1800, back-formation from prize. ("lever"), construed as a plural noun or as a 3rd-person singular verb.

NounEdit

pry (plural pries)

  1. A lever.
  2. Leverage.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pry (third-person singular simple present pries, present participle prying, simple past and past participle pried)

  1. To use leverage to open or widen. (See also prise and prize.)
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit