EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin radiālis (radial), from Latin radius.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

radial (comparative more radial, superlative most radial)

  1. Arranged like rays that radiate from, or converge to a common centre.
    • 2012 March 1, Henry Petroski, “Opening Doors”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, page 112-3:
      A doorknob of whatever roundish shape is effectively a continuum of levers, with the axis of the latching mechanism—known as the spindle—being the fulcrum about which the turning takes place. Applying a force tangential to the knob is essentially equivalent to applying one perpendicular to a radial line defining the lever.
  2. Moving along a radius.
  3. (anatomy) Of, or relating to the radius bone.
  4. (entomology) Of, or relating to the radius (vein), and/or the wing areas next to it.
  5. (botany) Developing uniformly on all sides.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

radial (plural radials)

  1. A radial tire / radial tyre.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ʁaˈdi̯aːl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

radial (not comparable)

  1. radial

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

radial

  1. radially

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French radial

AdjectiveEdit

radial m or n (feminine singular radială, masculine plural radiali, feminine and neuter plural radiale)

  1. radial

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

radio +‎ -al

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /raˈdjal/, [raˈð̞jal]

AdjectiveEdit

radial (plural radiales)

  1. radial
  2. (relational) radio

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

radial m (plural radiales)

  1. (geometry) radian

Further readingEdit