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See also: Radius, RADIUS, and radíus

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
A radius shown in red

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin radius (ray). Doublet of ray.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: rā'-dē-əs, IPA(key): /ˈɹeɪ.di.əs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪdiəs
  • Hyphenation: ra‧di‧us

NounEdit

radius (plural radii or radiuses)

  1. (anatomy) The long bone in the forearm, on the side of the thumb.
  2. (zoology) The lighter bone (or fused portion of bone) in the forelimb of an animal.
  3. (entomology) One of the major veins of the insect wing, between the subcosta and the media
  4. (geometry) A line segment between any point of a circle or sphere and its center.
  5. (geometry) The length of this line segment.
  6. Anything resembling a radius, such as the spoke of a wheel, the movable arm of a sextant, or one of the radiating lines of a spider's web.

SynonymsEdit

  • (vein of insect wing): R

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin radius.

NounEdit

radius

  1. radius (line segment or length of this line segment)

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[1], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin radius.

NounEdit

radius c (singular definite radien or radiusen, plural indefinite radier or radiuser)

  1. (geometry) radius

ReferencesEdit


EsperantoEdit

VerbEdit

radius

  1. conditional of radii

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin radius. Doublet of rai, which was inherited.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

radius m (plural radius)

  1. (anatomy) radius

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IdoEdit

VerbEdit

radius

  1. conditional of radiar

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain origin. Some have tried to connect it to rādīx. Tucker suggests Proto-Indo-European *neredʰ- (extend forth, rise, outward) akin to Sanskrit वर्धते (vardhate, rise, grow), or from Ancient Greek ἄρδις (árdis, sharp point).[1] May ultimately be from Proto-Indo-European *reh₁t- (bar, beam, stem).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

radius m (genitive radiī); second declension

  1. ray (of light)
  2. staff, rod
  3. spoke (of a wheel)

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative radius radiī
Genitive radiī radiōrum
Dative radiō radiīs
Accusative radium radiōs
Ablative radiō radiīs
Vocative radie radiī

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tucker, T.G., Etymological Dictionary of Latin, Ares Publishers, 1976 (reprint of 1931 edition).

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin radius.

NounEdit

radius m (definite singular radien or radiusen, indefinite plural radier, definite plural radiene)

  1. (geometry) radius

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin radius.

NounEdit

radius m (definite singular radiusen, indefinite plural radiusar, definite plural radiusane)

  1. (geometry) radius

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French radius, Latin radius. Compare the inherited doublet rază (ray).

NounEdit

radius n (plural radiusuri)

  1. (anatomy) radius (bone)

Related termsEdit