See also: RATO and Rato

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Acronym of rocket assisted take-off.

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

rato (plural ratos)

  1. An auxiliary rocket engine in a detachable unit that provides extra power for the takeoff of an aircraft
  2. A takeoff assisted by such a unit
  3. JATO

AnagramsEdit


'Are'areEdit

NounEdit

rato

  1. sun

ReferencesEdit


EsperantoEdit

 
Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eo
 
Rato en urba strato

EtymologyEdit

Probably of Romance origin.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈrato/
  • Hyphenation: ra‧to
  • Rhymes: -ato
  • Audio:
    (file)

NounEdit

rato (accusative singular raton, plural ratoj, accusative plural ratojn)

  1. rat (any rodent of the genus Rattus)

Derived termsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

13th century. Obscure. From a family of words common to most Romance and Germanic languages; the Germanic origin of this family of words is not universally accepted.[1] Confer rat.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rato m (plural ratos)

  1. mouse
  2. (computer hardware) mouse (input device used to move a pointer on the screen)
  3. saury (Scomberesox saurus)

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • rraton” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • rato” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • rato” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • rato” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

IdoEdit

 
rato (de speco Rattus rattus).

NounEdit

rato (plural rati)

  1. rat

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin ratus, perfect passive participle of reor (I deem, judge).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈra.to/
  • Hyphenation: rà‧to

AdjectiveEdit

rato (feminine rata, masculine plural rati, feminine plural rate)

  1. (literary, rare) ratified, confirmed
  2. (canon law, of marriage) valid, ratified, approved
    Antonyms: invalido, irrito
  3. (law, rare) Synonym of stipulato

ReferencesEdit

  • rato in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ratō

  1. dative masculine singular of ratus
  2. dative neuter singular of ratus
  3. ablative masculine singular of ratus
  4. ablative neuter singular of ratus

ReferencesEdit

  • rato in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • rato in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • rato in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *rattaz (rat). See German Ratte.

NounEdit

rato m

  1. rat

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle High German: ratte, rate

PortugueseEdit

 
rato (Mus musculus)

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil including São Paulo) /ˈʁa.tu/, [ˈha.tu]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /ˈʁa.tu/, [ˈχa.tu]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈʁa.tu/, [ˈʁa.tu]

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin rattus (rat), of Germanic origin. Cognate to Galician rato and Spanish ratón. Mostly displaced Old Portuguese mur.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

rato m (plural ratos, feminine rata, feminine plural ratas)

  1. rat (any rodent of the genus Rattus)
  2. mouse (any rodent of the genus Mus)
    Synonym: (Brazil) camundongo
  3. (computer hardware, Portugal) mouse (input device used to move a pointer on the screen)
    Synonym: (Brazil) mouse
  4. burglar; petty thief (person who steals small objects)
    Synonyms: gatuno, ladrão
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Latin raptus, compare Spanish rato.

NounEdit

rato m (plural ratos)

  1. (Trás-os-Montes) while (a very short period of time)
    Synonyms: bocado, pouco

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈrato/, [ˈra.t̪o]

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin raptus.

NounEdit

rato m (plural ratos)

  1. a while, bit (a short period of time)
    • 1997, Roberto Bolaño, “Henri Simon Leprince”, in Llamadas telefónicas [Last Evenings on Earth]:
      Durante tres meses, en los ratos libres que le deja el periódico y su labor clandestina escribe un poema de más de seiscientos versos en donde se sumerge en el misterio y en el martirio de los poetas menores.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. time
    Pasó un buen rato viendo la película.He/She had a good time watching the movie.
    Me hizo pasar un mal rato.I had a terrible time because of him/her.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From rata, this from Proto-Germanic *rattaz.

NounEdit

rato m (plural ratos, feminine rata, feminine plural ratas)

  1. (archaic) male rat

Further readingEdit