See also: Transit, trànsit, and transît

English edit

Etymology edit

From French, from Latin transire (to go across, pass in, pass through), from trans (over) +‎ ire (to go).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

transit (countable and uncountable, plural transits)

  1. The act of passing over, across, or through something.
  2. The conveyance of people or goods from one place to another, especially on a public transportation system; the vehicles used for such conveyance.
    the transit of goods through a country
  3. (astronomy) The passage of a celestial body or other object across the observer's meridian, or across the disk of a larger celestial body.
  4. A surveying instrument rather like a theodolite that measures horizontal and vertical angles.
  5. (navigation) An imaginary line between two objects whose positions are known. When the navigator sees one object directly in front of the other, the navigator knows that his position is on the transit.
  6. (British) A Ford Transit van, see Transit.
    Beufort road, Birkenhead, about 17.15 June 19 2013, white transit overtakes and swerves left into junction almost taking my front wheel.
  7. (Canada, US) Public transport system.
    I always take the transit to work.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

transit (third-person singular simple present transits, present participle transiting, simple past and past participle transited)

  1. To pass over, across or through something.
  2. To convey people or goods from one place to another, especially by public transport vehicles.
  3. To revolve an instrument about its horizontal axis so as to reverse its direction.
  4. (astronomy, intransitive) To make a transit.
  5. (Internet) To carry communications traffic to and from a customer or another network on a compensation basis as opposed to peerage in which the traffic to and from another network is carried on an equivalency basis or without charge.

Translations edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Joan Beal (2002) English Pronunciation in the Eighteenth Century: Thomas Spence's Grand Repository of the English Language[1], Oxford University Press, →ISBN, retrieved 27 April 2018, page 109

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

transit

  1. inflection of transir:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. third-person singular past historic

Indonesian edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch transit, from French transit, from Latin trānseō.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈtransɪt]
  • Hyphenation: tran‧sit

Noun edit

transit (first-person possessive transitku, second-person possessive transitmu, third-person possessive transitnya)

  1. transit,
    1. (trading) the conveyance of people or goods from one place to another, especially on a public transportation system; the vehicles used for such conveyance.
    2. (astronomy) The passage of a celestial body across the observer's meridian, or across the disk of a larger celestial body.

Alternative forms edit

Further reading edit

Ladin edit

Noun edit

transit m (plural transic)

  1. transit

Latin edit

Verb edit

trānsit

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of trānseō

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkish ترانسیت (transit), from French transit.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

transit (definite accusative transiti, plural transitler)

  1. transit

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative transit
Definite accusative transiti
Singular Plural
Nominative transit transitler
Definite accusative transiti transitleri
Dative transite transitlere
Locative transitte transitlerde
Ablative transitten transitlerden
Genitive transitin transitlerin