See also: ánimo, animó, animò, and ânimo

Contents

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

animo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of animar

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin animus.

NounEdit

animo m, n ‎(uncountable)

  1. desire, interest in doing something
    Er was weinig animo voor de strandwandeling.
    There was not much interest in the walk on the beach.

EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

animo ‎(accusative singular animon, plural animoj, accusative plural animojn)

  1. soul (an immaterial individual essence regarded as the source of life)
    • 1908, Adolf Krafft (translator), Robinsono Kruso, Part II:
      Ni nun tute transdonis niajn animojn al Dio.
      Now we completely gave our souls over to God.
  2. passion and feeling

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin animus.

NounEdit

animo m ‎(plural animi)

  1. mind
  2. spirit, courage
    Animo!‎ ― Have courage!
  3. inclination
  4. thought
  5. opinion

VerbEdit

animo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of animare

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From anima +‎ .

VerbEdit

animō ‎(present infinitive animāre, perfect active animāvī, supine animātum); first conjugation

  1. I fill with breath or air.
  2. I animate, quicken.
  3. I refresh, revive.
  4. I transform into a living being, give or bring life; inspire.
  5. I give or endow with a particular disposition of mind; rouse, incite.
  6. I encourage, help.
  7. (of colours) I enliven.
  8. (of torches) I kindle, light.
InflectionEdit
   Conjugation of animo (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present animō animās animat animāmus animātis animant
imperfect animābam animābās animābat animābāmus animābātis animābant
future animābō animābis animābit animābimus animābitis animābunt
perfect animāvī animāvistī animāvit animāvimus animāvistis animāvērunt, animāvēre
pluperfect animāveram animāverās animāverat animāverāmus animāverātis animāverant
future perfect animāverō animāveris animāverit animāverimus animāveritis animāverint
passive present animor animāris, animāre animātur animāmur animāminī animantur
imperfect animābar animābāris, animābāre animābātur animābāmur animābāminī animābantur
future animābor animāberis, animābere animābitur animābimur animābiminī animābuntur
perfect animātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect animātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect animātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present animem animēs animet animēmus animētis animent
imperfect animārem animārēs animāret animārēmus animārētis animārent
perfect animāverim animāverīs animāverit animāverīmus animāverītis animāverint
pluperfect animāvissem animāvissēs animāvisset animāvissēmus animāvissētis animāvissent
passive present animer animēris, animēre animētur animēmur animēminī animentur
imperfect animārer animārēris, animārēre animārētur animārēmur animārēminī animārentur
perfect animātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect animātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present animā animāte
future animātō animātō animātōte animantō
passive present animāre animāminī
future animātor animātor animantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives animāre animāvisse animātūrus esse animārī animātus esse animātum īrī
participles animāns animātūrus animātus animandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
animāre animandī animandō animandum animātum animātū
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

animō

  1. dative singular of animus
  2. ablative singular of animus

ReferencesEdit

  • animo in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • animo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ANIMO in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • animo in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to picture a thing to oneself; to imagine: oculis, ante oculos (animo) proponere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to be well-disposed towards..: benevolo animo esse in aliquem
    • (ambiguous) to look favourably upon; to support: propenso animo, studio esse or propensa voluntate esse in aliquem (opp. averso animo esse ab aliquo)
    • (ambiguous) to indulge oneself: animo or simply sibi indulgere
    • (ambiguous) to be magnanimous, broad-minded: magno animo esse
    • (ambiguous) (1) to be attentive; (2) to keep one's presence of mind: animo adesse
    • (ambiguous) to obscure the mental vision: mentis quasi luminibus officere (vid. sect. XIII. 6) or animo caliginem offundere
    • (ambiguous) to form an idea of a thing, imagine, conceive: animo, cogitatione aliquid fingere (or simply fingere, but without sibi), informare
    • (ambiguous) to form an idea of a thing, imagine, conceive: animo concipere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to form a conception of a thing beforehand: animo, cogitatione aliquid praecipere (Off 1. 23. 81)
    • (ambiguous) to grasp a thing mentally: animo, mente, cogitatione aliquid comprehendere, complecti
    • (ambiguous) a vague notion presents itself to my mind: aliquid animo meo obversatur (cf. sect. III, s. v. oculi)
    • (ambiguous) innate ideas: notiones animo (menti) insitae, innatae
    • (ambiguous) to form a conception, notion of a thing: notionem or rationem alicuius rei in animo informare or animo concipere
    • (ambiguous) to have formed an ideal notion of a thing: comprehensam quandam animo speciem (alicuius rei) habere
    • (ambiguous) to conceive an ideal: singularem quandam perfectionis imaginem animo concipere
    • (ambiguous) to be imbibing false opinions: opiniones falsas animo imbibere
    • (ambiguous) to get a mistaken notion into the mind: errorem animo imbibere
    • (ambiguous) to relieve a man of his scruple: scrupulum ex animo alicuius evellere (Rosc. Am. 2. 6)
    • (ambiguous) to think over, consider a thing: secum (cum animo) reputare aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to think over, consider a thing: considerare in, cum animo, secum aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to think over, consider a thing: agitare (in) mente or (in) animo aliquid
    • (ambiguous) I am resolved; it is my intention: in animo habeo or mihi est in animo c. Inf.
    • (ambiguous) to think of a person with a grateful sense of his goodness: nomen alicuius grato animo prosequi
    • (ambiguous) the memory of this will never fade from my mind: numquam ex animo meo memoria illius rei discedet
    • (ambiguous) a thing escapes, vanishes from the memory: aliquid excidit e memoria, effluit, excidit ex animo
    • (ambiguous) a thing is deeply impressed on the mind: aliquid in animo haeret, penitus insedit or infixum est
    • (ambiguous) to impress a thing on one's memory, mind: aliquid animo mentique penitus mandare (Catil. 1. 11. 27)
    • (ambiguous) to be humorously inclined: animo prompto esse ad iocandum
    • (ambiguous) to be so disposed: ita animo affectum esse
    • (ambiguous) to excite emotion: motus excitare in animo (opp. sedare, exstinguere)
    • (ambiguous) grief has struck deep into his soul: dolor infixus animo haeret (Phil. 2. 26)
    • (ambiguous) to enjoy peace of mind: quieto, tranquillo, securo animo esse
    • (ambiguous) to be very uneasy; to fret: (animo) angi (Brut. 27)
    • (ambiguous) to be brave, courageous: bono animo esse
    • (ambiguous) to be brave by nature: animo forti esse
    • (ambiguous) to show a brisk and cheerful spirit: alacri et erecto animo esse
    • (ambiguous) to lose courage; to despair: animo cadere, deficere
    • (ambiguous) to be cast down, discouraged, in despair: animo esse humili, demisso (more strongly animo esse fracto, perculso et abiecto) (Att. 3. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to possess presence of mind: praesenti animo uti (vid. sect. VI. 8, note uti...)
    • (ambiguous) to endure a thing with (the greatest) sang-froid: aequo (aequissimo) animo ferre aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to be resigned to a thing: (animo) paratum esse ad aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to lose one's composure; to be disconcerted: perturbari (animo)
    • (ambiguous) to be quite unconcerned: animo adesse (Sull. 11. 33)
    • (ambiguous) to conceive a hope: spem concipere animo
    • (ambiguous) to be waiting in suspense for..: suspenso animo exspectare aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to stifle, repress all humane sentiments in one's mind: omnem humanitatem ex animo exstirpare (Amic. 13. 48)
    • (ambiguous) to love deeply: aliquem ex animo or ex animi sententia amare (Q. Fr. 1. 1. 5)
    • (ambiguous) to banish love from one's mind: amorem ex animo eicere
    • (ambiguous) to banish all feeling of prejudice from the mind: suspicionem ex animo delere
    • (ambiguous) he is in a suspicious mood: suspicio insidet in animo ejus
    • (ambiguous) my mind forebodes misfortune: animo praesagio malum
    • (ambiguous) something is contrary to my moral sense, goes against my principles: aliquid abhorret a meis moribus (opp. insitum [atque innatum] est animo or in animo alicuius)
    • (ambiguous) to be inconsistent, changeable: animo mobili esse (Fam. 5. 2. 10)
    • (ambiguous) belief in God is part of every one's nature: omnibus innatum est et in animo quasi insculptum esse deum
    • (ambiguous) to devote oneself body and soul to the good of the state: totum et animo et corpore in salutem rei publicae se conferre
    • (ambiguous) to consider oneself already victor: victoriam praecipere (animo) (Liv. 10. 26)

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

animo

  1. First-person singular (eu) present indicative of animar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

animo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of animar.
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