See also: Code and codé

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English code (system of law), from Old French code (system of law), from Latin cōdex, later form of caudex (the stock or stem of a tree, a board or tablet of wood smeared over with wax, on which the ancients originally wrote; hence, a book, a writing.). Doublet of codex.

Noun edit

code (countable and uncountable, plural codes)

  1. A short textual designation, often with little relation to the item it represents.
    This flavour of soup has been assigned the code WRT-9.
  2. A body of law, sanctioned by legislation, in which the rules of law to be specifically applied by the courts are set forth in systematic form; a compilation of laws by public authority; a digest.
    • 1872, Francis Wharton, A Treatise on the Conflict of Laws:
      the mild and impartial spirit which pervades the Code compiled under Canute
  3. Any system of principles, rules or regulations relating to one subject.
    The medical code is a system of rules for the regulation of the professional conduct of physicians.
    The naval code is a system of rules for making communications at sea by means of signals.
  4. A set of rules for converting information into another form or representation.
    1. By synecdoche: a codeword, code point, an encoded representation of a character, symbol, or other entity.
      The ASCII code of "A" is 65.
  5. A message represented by rules intended to conceal its meaning.
    • 2014 June 21, “Magician’s brain”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8892:
      [Isaac Newton] was obsessed with alchemy. He spent hours copying alchemical recipes and trying to replicate them in his laboratory. He believed that the Bible contained numerological codes.
  6. (cryptography) A cryptographic system using a codebook that converts words or phrases into codewords.
  7. (programming, uncountable) Instructions for a computer, written in a programming language; the input of a translator, an interpreter or a browser, namely: source code, machine code, bytecode.
    Object-oriented C++ code is easier to understand for a human than C code.
    I wrote some code to reformat text documents.
    This HTML code may be placed on your web page.
  8. (scientific programming) A program.
  9. (linguistics) A particular lect or language variety.
  10. (medicine) An emergency requiring situation-trained members of the staff.
  11. (informal) A set of unwritten rules that bind a social group.
    girl code
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Derived terms of code without hyponyms
More derived terms (unsorted, some are hyponyms and some not
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Hindi: कूट (kūṭ)
    • Sanskrit: कूट (kūṭa)
  • Japanese: コード (kōdo)
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also edit

Verb edit

code (third-person singular simple present codes, present participle coding, simple past and past participle coded)

  1. (computing) To write software programs.
    I learned to code on an early home computer in the 1980s.
  2. (transitive) To add codes to (a data set).
    • 2018, James Lambert, “A multitude of ‘lishes’: The nomenclature of hybridity”, in English World-Wide[1], page 5:
      The resulting citation collection was databased and coded for meaning, etymon, and date range (earliest and latest occurrence found).
  3. To categorise by assigning identifiers from a schedule, for example CPT coding for medical insurance purposes.
  4. (cryptography) To encode.
    We should code the messages we send out on Usenet.
  5. (genetics, intransitive) To encode a protein.
  6. (medicine) To call a hospital emergency code.
    coding in the CT scanner
  7. (intransitive, medicine) To go into a state where a hospital emergency code is required to save one's life.
    He coded out of nowhere
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From code blue, a medical emergency.

Verb edit

code (third-person singular simple present codes, present participle coding, simple past and past participle coded)

  1. (medicine) Of a patient, to suffer a sudden medical emergency (a code blue) such as cardiac arrest.
Translations edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Aromanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Vulgar Latin coda, from Latin cauda. Compare Daco-Romanian coadă.

Noun edit

code f (plural codz, definite articulation coda)

  1. tail

Derived terms edit

Chinese edit

Etymology edit

From English code.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

code

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) code (symbol)
  2. (Hong Kong Cantonese, computing) code
    揼code [Cantonese]  ―  dap6 kuk1 [Jyutping]  ―  to write (computer) code

See also edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowing from French code, in the senses relating to laws and rules. Senses related to cryptography and coding have been borrowed from English code. Both derive from Old French code, from Latin cōdex.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkoː.də/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: co‧de

Noun edit

code m (plural codes, diminutive codetje n)

  1. book or body of laws, code of laws, lawbook
    Synonym: wetboek
  2. system of rules and principles, e.g. of conduct
  3. code (set of symbols)
  4. code (text written in a programming language)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Indonesian: kode

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

code m (plural codes)

  1. code

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Vulgar Latin cōda, variant of Latin cauda.

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun edit

code f (plural codis)

  1. tail
  2. queue, line

Italian edit

Noun edit

code f

  1. plural of coda

Anagrams edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English cudu, cwidu, cweodu, from Proto-West Germanic *kwidu.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkud(ə)/, /ˈkoːd(ə)/, /ˈkweːd(ə)/, /ˈkwid(ə)/

Noun edit

code (uncountable)

  1. Any kind of plant gum; a gummy or resinous substance.
  2. Cud; regurgitated food chewed upon by livestock.
    • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Osee 7:14”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      And thei crieden not to me in her herte, but ȝelliden in her beddis. Thei chewiden code on wheete, and wyn, and thei ȝeden awei fro me.
      And they didn't cry to me from their hearts; instead they whined in their beds. They chewed wheat and wine like cud, then they ran away from me.
  3. (rare) A mass or lump; a large pile of something.
Descendants edit
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old French code, from Latin cōdex, caudex.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔːd(ə)/
  • (Northern) IPA(key): /ˈkøːd(ə)/

Noun edit

code (rare)

  1. A coherent and unified body of laws.
  2. The core of someone's last testament.
Descendants edit
References edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Old English codd and Old Norse koddi.

Noun edit

code

  1. Alternative form of codde (seedpod)

Old French edit

Noun edit

code oblique singularm (oblique plural codes, nominative singular codes, nominative plural code)

  1. Alternative form of coute

Tarantino edit

Noun edit

code

  1. tail