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See also: rimé and ríme

Contents

EnglishEdit

 rime on Wikipedia
 
Rime on trees.

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English rim, from Old English hrīm, from Proto-Germanic *hrīmaz, *hrīmą (hoarfrost) (compare Dutch rijm, Danish rim); akin to Latvian krèims (cream) and Latin bruma (winter solstice).

NounEdit

rime (uncountable)

  1. (meteorology, uncountable) Ice formed by the rapid freezing of cold water droplets of fog onto a cold surface.
    • De Quincey
      The trees were now covered with rime.
    • 1899, Knut Hamsun, Hunger, translated by George Egerton, Part III, page 167
      I rose, put on my shoes, and began to walk up and down the floor to try and warm myself. I looked out; there was rime on the window; it was snowing.
  2. (meteorology, uncountable) A coating or sheet of ice so formed.
  3. (uncountable) A film or slimy coating.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

rime (third-person singular simple present rimes, present participle riming, simple past and past participle rimed)

  1. To freeze or congeal into hoarfrost.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English rime, from Old English rīm (number; the precise sum or aggregation of any collection of individual things or persons), from Proto-Germanic *rīmą (calculation, number), from Proto-Indo-European *rēy- (to regulate, count). Influenced in meaning by Old French rime from the same Germanic source.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

rime (plural rimes)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal) Number.
  2. (archaic except in direct borrowings from French) Rhyme.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Landor to this entry?)
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in the 18th century.
  3. (linguistics) The second part of a syllable, from the vowel on, as opposed to the onset.

VerbEdit

rime (third-person singular simple present rimes, present participle riming, simple past and past participle rimed)

  1. Obsolete form of rhyme.

Etymology 3Edit

Unknown

NounEdit

rime (plural rimes)

  1. A step of a ladder; a rung.

Etymology 4Edit

Latin rima.

NounEdit

rime (plural rimes)

  1. A rent or long aperture; a chink; a fissure; a crack.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Thomas Browne to this entry?)
Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

rime (imperative rim, infinitive at rime, present tense rimer, past tense rimede, perfect tense rimet)

  1. to rhyme

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French rime, from Vulgar Latin *rimare, from Frankish *rīm or Old High German rīm (series, row, number). Akin to Old English rīm (row, series, number).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ʁim/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -im

NounEdit

rime f (plural rimes)

  1. rhyme

VerbEdit

rime

  1. inflection of rimer:
    1. first-person and third-person singular present indicative and subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

rime f

  1. plural of rima

AnagramsEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

rime m, f

  1. line of poetry, verse
  2. rhyme

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • rime (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • rime (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English rīm (number).

NounEdit

rime (plural rimes)

  1. number
    Þatt full wel iss bitacnedd Þurrh tale & rime off fowwerrtiȝ, Off fowwerr siþe tene. — Ormulum, c1200
    (That full well is betokened thru tale and the number of forty, of four times ten.)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /riː.me/, [ˈɾiː.mə]

Etymology 1Edit

From the noun rim, from Old Norse rím, from French rime

VerbEdit

rime (imperative rim, present tense rimer, simple past rimte or rimet or rima, past participle rimt or rima)

  1. to rhyme
  2. to match, line up
    Informasjonen han ga rimte ikke med det vi allerede viste.
    The information he gave us didn't match with what we already knew.

Etymology 2Edit

From rim, from Old Norse hrím

VerbEdit

rime (imperative rim, present tense rimer, simple past rimet or rima, past participle rimt or rima)

  1. to rime

ReferencesEdit

“rime” in The Bokmål Dictionary.


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /riː.me/, [ˈɾiː.mə]

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From rim, from Old Norse rím, from French rime

VerbEdit

rime (imperative rim, present tense rimar, simple past rima, past participle rima)

  1. to rhyme
  2. to match, line up

Etymology 2Edit

From rim, from Old Norse hrím

VerbEdit

rime (imperative rim, present tense rimar, simple past rima, past participle rima)

  1. to rime

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse rimi

NounEdit

rime

  1. an elongated row of hills or low mountains
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

“rime” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

rime f (oblique plural rimes, nominative singular rime, nominative plural rimes)

  1. story; tale; account

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rime

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of rimar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of rimar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of rimar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of rimar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

rime

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of rimar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of rimar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of rimar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of rimar.