dimension

See also: Dimension and dimensión

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dīmēnsiō, dīmēnsiōnem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dimension (plural dimensions)

  1. A single aspect of a given thing.
    This film can be enjoyed on many dimensions - the script is great, the acting is realistic, and the special effects will simply take you aback.
  2. A measure of spatial extent in a particular direction, such as height, width or breadth, or depth.
    • 1992, Douglas Adams, chapter 17, in Mostly Harmless (The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy), page 150:
      I can tell you that in your universe you move freely in three dimensions that you call space. [] After that it gets a bit complicated, and there's all sort of stuff going on in dimensions thirteen to twenty-two that you really wouldn't want to know about.
    • 2012 January 1, Robert L. Dorit, “Rereading Darwin”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 1, page 23:
      We live our lives in three dimensions for our threescore and ten allotted years. Yet every branch of contemporary science, from statistics to cosmology, alludes to processes that operate on scales outside of human experience: the millisecond and the nanometer, the eon and the light-year.
  3. A construct whereby objects or individuals can be distinguished.
  4. (geometry) The number of independent coordinates needed to specify uniquely the location of a point in a space; also, any of such independent coordinates.
  5. (linear algebra) The number of elements of any basis of a vector space.
  6. (physics) One of the physical properties that are regarded as fundamental measures of a physical quantity, such as mass, length and time.
    The dimension of velocity is length divided by time.
  7. (computing) Any of the independent ranges of indices in a multidimensional array.
  8. (science fiction, fantasy) A universe or plane of existence.
    a machine that lets you travel to a parallel dimension.
    • 1938 July, L. Ron Hubbard, “The Dangerous Dimension”, in Astounding Science-Fiction[2], volume XXI, number 5, Street & Smith, OCLC 10756251, page 105:
      "If a man should wish to be in some other place, it is entirely possible for him to imagine himself in that place and, diving back through the negative dimension, to emerge out of it in that place with instantaneous rapidity. To imagine oneself———"
    • 1988 May 2, Rod Loomis, Michelle Phillips, Gates McFadden, We'll Always Have Paris (Star Trek: The Next Generation), Paramount Domestic Television, OCLC 857144250:
      DR. PAUL MANHEIM: I have been on the other side. I have touched another dimension. Part of me is still there.
      LAURA MANHEIM: Help him.
      DR. CRUSHER: Try to stay calm Dr. Manheim. I don't think it's going to help you're struggling against it.
      DR. PAUL MANHEIM: My mind is floating between two places. It is difficult to know which is which. There is no way to explain it.
    • 2016, A.K. Brown, Jumpstart (Champagne Universe Series: Book 1), page 2:
      He was experimenting with matter transportation through the nth dimension.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

dimension (third-person singular simple present dimensions, present participle dimensioning, simple past and past participle dimensioned)

  1. (transitive) To mark, cut or shape something to specified dimensions.
  2. (transitive, programming) To specify the size of (an array or similar data structure); to allocate.
    Hyponym: redimension
    • 2002, James D. Foxall, ‎Wendy Haro-Chun, SAMS Teach Yourself C# in 24 Hours (page 268)
      Dimension an array to hold only as much data as you intend to put into it.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

dimension

  1. accusative singular of dimensio

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

dimension

  1. genitive singular of dimensio

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin dīmensio, dīmensiōnem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dimension f (plural dimensions)

  1. dimension

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dīmensio. Attested from the 14th century.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

dimension f (plural dimensions)

  1. dimension

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Diccionari General de la Lenga Occitana, L’Academia occitana – Consistòri del Gai Saber, 2008-2016, page 201.