See also: How

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English how, hou, hu, hwu, from Old English , from Proto-Germanic *hwō, from the same root as hwæt (who, what). /hw/ > /h/ due to wh-cluster reduction in Old English; compare who, which underwent this change later, and thus is spelt wh (Middle English spelling of /hw/) but pronounced /h/ (it previously had a different vowel, hence avoided the spelling and sound change in Old English). Vowel change per Great Vowel Shift.

Akin to Scots hoo, foo (how), Saterland Frisian wo (how), West Frisian hoe (how), Low German ho, wo, wu (how), Dutch hoe (how), German wie (how), Swedish hur (how). See who and compare why.

AdverbEdit

how (not comparable)

  1. To what degree.
    How often do you practice?
    The gauge indicated how hot the oven was.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, in The Celebrity:
      No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or otherwise his man would be there with a message to say that his master would shortly join me if I would kindly wait.
  2. In what manner.
    How do you solve this puzzle?
    How else can we get this finished?
    She showed him how to do it.
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. [] But as a foundation for analysis it is highly subjective: it rests on difficult decisions about what counts as a territory, what counts as output and how to value it. Indeed, economists are still tweaking it.
  3. In what state.
    How are you?
    How was your vacation?
    How the stock market interprets events has real consequences.
  4. Used as a modifier to indicate surprise, delight, or other strong feelings in an exclamation.
    How very interesting!
    How wonderful it was to receive your invitation.
Usage notesEdit
  • See usage notes on else (adverb).
  • How good is it? means "To what extent is it good?", whereas How is it good? means "In what manner is it good?". Likewise, I know how good it is means "I know the extent to which it is good", whereas I know how it is good means "I know the manner in which it is good".
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

how (plural hows)

  1. The means by which something is accomplished.
    I am not interested in the why, but in the how.
    • 1924, Joseph Rickaby, Studies on God and His Creatures, page 102:
      It is an a posteriori argument, evincing the fact, but not the how.
    • 2008 March 21, The New York Times, “Movie Guide and Film Series”, in New York Times[1]:
      A wham-bam caper flick, efficiently directed by Roger Donaldson, that fancifully revisits the mysterious whos and speculative hows of a 1971 London bank heist.

ConjunctionEdit

how

  1. The manner or way that.
    I remember how I solved this puzzle.
  2. That, the fact that, the way that.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English howe, hough, hogh, partly from Old English hōh (promontory), and partly from Old Norse haugr (a how, mound). Compare Old French höe (hillock, hill), from the same Germanic source.

NounEdit

how (plural hows)

  1. (dialectal) An artificial barrow or tumulus.
  2. (dialectal) A small hill in northern England. (Usage preserved mainly in place names.)

Etymology 3Edit

From a Siouan language, compare Lakota háu. Alternatively from Wyandot haau.

Alternative formsEdit

InterjectionEdit

how

  1. A greeting, used in representations of Native American speech.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


AbauEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

how

  1. taro

AlabamaEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

AdverbEdit

how

  1. yes

SynonymsEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

how

  1. here

Further readingEdit

  • how in Ernst Muka/Mucke (St. Petersburg and Prague 1911–28): Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow / Wörterbuch der nieder-wendischen Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Reprinted 2008, Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.
  • how in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.