English

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Etymology

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From Middle English baroun, from Old French baron, from Latin barōnem, from Proto-West Germanic *barō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to bear). Cognate with Old High German baro (human being, man, freeman), Old English bora (a man who bears responsibility, one who is in charge, a ruler), and perhaps to Old English beorn (man, warrior). Used in early Germanic law in the sense of "man, human being".

A Celtic origin has also been suggested; see the quote under sense 3 of Latin barō. However, the OED takes the hypothetical Proto-Celtic *bar- (hero) to be a figment.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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baron (plural barons, feminine baroness)

  1. The male ruler of a barony.
  2. A male member of the lowest rank of English nobility (the equivalent rank in Scotland is lord).
    Coordinate terms: don, duke, earl, lord, prince, baronet
  3. (by extension) A person of great power in society, especially in business and politics.
    Synonyms: magnate, tycoon; see also Thesaurus:important person
    • c. 1948, George Orwell, Such, Such Were the Joys:
      There were a few exotics among them — some South American boys, sons of Argentine beef barons, one or two Russians, and even a Siamese prince, or someone who was described as a prince.
    • 2013 August 10, Lexington, “Keeping the mighty honest”, in The Economist[1], volume 408, number 8848:
      British journalists shun complete respectability, feeling a duty to be ready to savage the mighty, or rummage through their bins. Elsewhere in Europe, government contracts and subsidies ensure that press barons will only defy the mighty so far.
  4. (UK, prison slang) A prisoner who gains power and influence by lending or selling goods such as tobacco.
    • 1960, Hugh J. Klare, Anatomy of Prison, page 33:
      The first thing a baron does is to accumulate a supply of tobacco. He spends every penny he can earn on laying it in []
    • 1961, Peter Baker, Time out of life, page 51:
      Nevertheless, from my own agonies of the first few months, after which I did not miss smoking at all, I could appreciate the need of others. It was in this atmosphere of craving that the 'barons' thrived. Barons are prisoners who lend tobacco.
    • 1980, Leonard Michaels, Christopher Ricks, The State of the Language, page 525:
      In British prisons tobacco still remains the gold standard which is made to back every transaction and promise. The official allowance is barely sufficient for individual smoking needs, but tobacco may expensively be borrowed or bought from a baron, possibly through his runner.
  5. A baron of beef, a cut made up of a double sirloin.
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, “chapter 34”, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, →OCLC:
      Such portentous appetites had Queequeg and Tashtego, that to fill out the vacancies made by the previous repast, often the pale Dough-Boy was fain to bring on a great baron of salt-junk, seemingly quarried out of the solid ox.
  6. Any of various nymphalid butterflies of the genus Euthalia.
  7. (law, obsolete) A husband.
    Coordinate term: wife
    baron and femehusband and wife

Derived terms

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Translations

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References

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  • "baron n.", Oxford English Dictionary, Second edition, 1989; first published in New English Dictionary, 1885.

Anagrams

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Azerbaijani

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Russian барон (baron).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [bɑˈron]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ron

Noun

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baron (definite accusative baronu, plural baronlar)

  1. baron

Declension

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    Declension of baron
singular plural
nominative baron
baronlar
definite accusative baronu
baronları
dative barona
baronlara
locative baronda
baronlarda
ablative barondan
baronlardan
definite genitive baronun
baronların
    Possessive forms of baron
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) baronum baronlarım
sənin (your) baronun baronların
onun (his/her/its) baronu baronları
bizim (our) baronumuz baronlarımız
sizin (your) baronunuz baronlarınız
onların (their) baronu or baronları baronları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) baronumu baronlarımı
sənin (your) baronunu baronlarını
onun (his/her/its) baronunu baronlarını
bizim (our) baronumuzu baronlarımızı
sizin (your) baronunuzu baronlarınızı
onların (their) baronunu or baronlarını baronlarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) baronuma baronlarıma
sənin (your) baronuna baronlarına
onun (his/her/its) baronuna baronlarına
bizim (our) baronumuza baronlarımıza
sizin (your) baronunuza baronlarınıza
onların (their) baronuna or baronlarına baronlarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) baronumda baronlarımda
sənin (your) baronunda baronlarında
onun (his/her/its) baronunda baronlarında
bizim (our) baronumuzda baronlarımızda
sizin (your) baronunuzda baronlarınızda
onların (their) baronunda or baronlarında baronlarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) baronumdan baronlarımdan
sənin (your) baronundan baronlarından
onun (his/her/its) baronundan baronlarından
bizim (our) baronumuzdan baronlarımızdan
sizin (your) baronunuzdan baronlarınızdan
onların (their) baronundan or baronlarından baronlarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) baronumun baronlarımın
sənin (your) baronunun baronlarının
onun (his/her/its) baronunun baronlarının
bizim (our) baronumuzun baronlarımızın
sizin (your) baronunuzun baronlarınızın
onların (their) baronunun or baronlarının baronlarının

Further reading

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  • baron” in Obastan.com.

Danish

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Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology

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From Old Norse barún, from Old French baron.

Noun

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baron c (singular definite baronen, plural indefinite baroner)

  1. baron (a nobleman, in Denmark since 1849 without privileges)

Inflection

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Derived terms

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References

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Dutch

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Etymology

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Readjustment from earlier baroen through modern French influence, from Middle Dutch baroen, from Old French baron.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /baːˈrɔn/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ron
  • Rhymes: -ɔn

Noun

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baron m (plural baronnen, diminutive baronnetje n, feminine barones)

  1. baron, a specific aristocratic title
  2. a magnate, especially a wealthy and influential (industrial) entrepreneur

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Indonesian: baron
  • Javanese: ꦧꦫꦺꦴꦤ꧀ (baron)

Esperanto

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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baron

  1. accusative singular of baro

French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Middle French baron, from Old French baron, from Latin barōnem.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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baron m (plural barons, feminine baronne)

  1. baron, lord, noble landowner

Descendants

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Further reading

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Anagrams

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Indonesian

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Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology

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Borrowed from Dutch baron.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈbarɔn]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ron

Noun

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baron (first-person possessive baronku, second-person possessive baronmu, third-person possessive baronnya)

  1. baron: the male ruler of a barony; a title for European noblemen.

Further reading

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Javanese

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Romanization

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baron

  1. Romanization of ꦧꦫꦺꦴꦤ꧀

Middle English

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Etymology 1

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Adjective

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baron

  1. Alternative form of bareyne

Etymology 2

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Noun

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baron

  1. Alternative form of baroun

Middle French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old French baron.

Noun

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baron m (plural barons)

  1. baron (nobleman)

Descendants

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Norman

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Noun

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baron m (plural barons)

  1. Alternative form of bâron

Norwegian Bokmål

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Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology

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From Old Norse barún, from Old French baron.

Noun

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baron m (definite singular baronen, indefinite plural baroner, definite plural baronene)

  1. a baron
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References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology

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From Old Norse barún, from Old French baron.

Noun

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baron m (definite singular baronen, indefinite plural baronar, definite plural baronane)

  1. a baron
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References

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Old Dutch

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *bazōną.

Verb

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baron

  1. to reveal, to make public

Inflection

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This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

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Further reading

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  • baron”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old French

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin barōnem.

The nominative singular ber is a regular outcome of the Latin nominative barō.

Noun

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baron oblique singularm (oblique plural barons, nominative singular ber, nominative plural baron)

  1. baron (title of nobility)
  2. husband
    Synonym: mari

Descendants

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Old Galician-Portuguese

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin barōnem.

Noun

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baron m (plural barões)

  1. man (adult male human)
    Synonym: home
    • 13th c, A. López Ferreiro, editor, Fueros Municipales de Santiago y de su tierra, page 699:
      aquel pecado escumungado que fazen os barones unos con outros
      that excommunicated sin that men do with one another
    • c. 1295, Ramón Lorenzo, editor, La traducción gallega de la Crónica General y de la Crónica de Castilla, Ourense: I.E.O.P.F, page 814:
      ca esta (he) muy boa et nobre rreyna dona Berĩguela co[m] tamana aguça gardou sempre este fillo et llj meteu no curaçõ feyto de obras de piedade de ome barõ, mãçebo et nino, et todo linagẽ de omes -esto he barõ et moller-
      because this very noble and excellent queen, Lady Berenguela, with great care protected her son and put in his heart acts of piety of adult man, young man and boy, and of all the lineage of men - that is, man and woman -

Descendants

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Further reading

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “baron”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “baron”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG

Old Spanish

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin barōnem. Sense 3 taken from the Old French cognate baron. Coromines considers the more general sense 2, which is attested earlier, to be indigenous.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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baron m

  1. man
    • c. 1200, La Fazienda de Ultramar, fol 6r
      Los de ysmael vendieron a ioseph a furtifar el egypcio de pharaon conestable. en essa ora, exio iuda asos ermanos e vna mugier, fija de un baron de Canaan
      The people of Ishmael sold Joseph to Potiphar the Egyptian Pharaoh's Constable. At that time, Juda departed to his brothers and a woman, the daughter of a man of Canaan.
  2. nobleman
  3. baron

Descendants

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References

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Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

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Borrowed from French baron.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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baron m pers (female equivalent baronessa, diminutive baronek)

  1. (historical) baron, lord (the male ruler of a barony)

Noun

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baron m pers

  1. (figuratively) baron, lord (a person of great power in society, especially in business and politics)
    Synonym: potentat

Declension

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Derived terms

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adjectives
nouns

Further reading

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  • baron in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • baron in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French baron.

Noun

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baron m (plural baroni)

  1. baron

Declension

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Serbo-Croatian

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Etymology

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Derived from Old French baron.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /bǎroːn/
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ron

Noun

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bàrōn m (Cyrillic spelling ба̀ро̄н)

  1. baron (title of nobility)

Swedish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Old French baron.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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baron c (feminine: baronessa)

  1. a baron, a ruler of a barony

Declension

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Declension of baron 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative baron baronen baroner baronerna
Genitive barons baronens baroners baronernas

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Tagalog

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Spanish barón.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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barón (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜇᜓᜈ᜔)

  1. baron (title of nobility)

Turkish

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Etymology

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Inherited from Ottoman Turkish بارون (baron), from French baron.[1]

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /baˈɾon/
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ron

Noun

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baron (definite accusative baronu, plural baronlar)

  1. baron (title of nobility in Europe between knight and viscount)

Declension

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Inflection
Nominative baron
Definite accusative baronu
Singular Plural
Nominative baron baronlar
Definite accusative baronu baronları
Dative barona baronlara
Locative baronda baronlarda
Ablative barondan baronlardan
Genitive baronun baronların
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular baronum baronlarım
2nd singular baronsun baronlarsın
3rd singular baron
barondur
baronlar
baronlardır
1st plural baronuz baronlarız
2nd plural baronsunuz baronlarsınız
3rd plural baronlar baronlardır

Derived terms

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References

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  1. ^ Nişanyan, Sevan (2002–) “baron”, in Nişanyan Sözlük

Further reading

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Uzbek

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Russian барон (baron).

Noun

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baron (plural baronlar)

  1. baron

Declension

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