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AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dūrāre, present active infinitive of dūrō.

VerbEdit

durar (first-person singular indicative present duro, past participle duráu)

  1. to last

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan durar, from Latin dūrāre, present active infinitive of dūrō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

durar (first-person singular present duro, past participle durat)

  1. to last, to continue over time
  2. to persist
  3. to wear well, to stand the test of time

Usage notesEdit

The main difference between trigar and durar when used transitively is that the former signifies some event that one has to wait for, while the latter signifies an ongoing action.

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese, from Latin dūrāre, present active infinitive of dūrō.

VerbEdit

durar (first-person singular present duro, first-person singular preterite durei, past participle durado)

  1. to last, to endure

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese, from Latin dūrāre, present active infinitive of dūrō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

durar (first-person singular present indicative duro, past participle durado)

  1. to last, endure
  2. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of durar
  3. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of durar
  4. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of durar
  5. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of durar

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dūrāre, present active infinitive of dūrō.

VerbEdit

durar (first-person singular present duro, first-person singular preterite duré, past participle durado)

  1. to last
    Un partido de fútbol dura 90 minutos.
    A football match lasts 90 minutes.
  2. to take time

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit