See also: Een, e'en, -een, eên, -éen, and één

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /iːn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

een

  1. (archaic and Scotland, Northern England) plural of eye
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, “Book I, Canto IV”, in The Faerie Queene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for William Ponsonbie, →OCLC, stanza 21:
      And eke with fatnesse swollen were his eyne
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide:
      But the sight of her eyes was not a thing to forget. John Dodds said they were the een of a deer with the Devil ahint them; and indeed, they would so appal an onlooker that a sudden unreasoning terror came into his heart, while his feet would impel him to flight.
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From a contraction of even.

Adverb edit

een (not comparable)

  1. (dialectal, Northern England) even.

Etymology 3 edit

From even (evening).

Noun edit

een (plural eens)

  1. (poetic or dialectal, Scotland) evening.
Synonyms edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Afrikaans numbers (edit)
10
 ←  0 1 2  →  10  → 
    Cardinal: een
    Ordinal: eerste
    Ordinal abbreviation: 1ste

Etymology edit

From Dutch een, from Middle Dutch een, from Old Dutch ēn, ein, from Proto-West Germanic *ain, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁óynos.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

een

  1. one

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Central Franconian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • ein (Kölsch; Westerwald)
  • ään (eastern Moselle Franconian)

Etymology edit

From Middle High German een, from Old High German ein.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

een

  1. (Ripuarian, western Moselle Franconian) one
    Loß mich der nur een Frooch stelle.
    Let me ask you just one question.
    Wanns de keene Steff häs, kann ich der eener jevve.
    If you don't have a pencil, I can give you one.

Declension edit

  • Nominative/Accusative:
    • Attributive: ee Mann or eene Mann, een Frau, ee Kend. The form ee becomes een before vowels and optionally elsewhere, whereas the feminine is always een.
    • Independent without determiner: eener or eene m, een f, eent or (younger) eens n.
    • Independent with determiner: dä/die/dat een or dä/die/dat eene.
  • Dative:
    • Without determiner: eenem Mann, eener Frau, eenem Kend.
    • With determiner: däm eene m/n, dä eene or dä eener f.
  • Eastern Moselle Franconian distinguishes masculine nominative and accusative. Masculine ää, ääner are nominative, whereas masculine ääne is accusative.
  • Westernmost Ripuarian has no dative forms. Moreover it uses the velarised stem eng- before vocalic endings and always in the feminine.

See also edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch êen, from Old Dutch ēn, ein, from Proto-West Germanic *ain, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁óynos.

Pronunciation 1 edit

Article edit

een (contracted form 'n)

  1. (indefinite article) Placed before a singular noun, indicating a general case of a person or thing: a, an. Compare with de and het.
Descendants edit
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: en
  • Negerhollands: een
  • Jersey Dutch: ên, en
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: aen

Pronunciation 2 edit

Numeral edit

Dutch cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : een
    Ordinal : eerst

een

  1. one
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: en
  • Jersey Dutch: êne, ên
  • Negerhollands: een, en
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: en
  • Trió: ein_me
See also edit

Usage notes edit

When it is unclear from the context whether een is the number (pronounced /eːn/) or the indefinite article (pronounced /ən/), the former is written with acute accents: één (one). In all other cases it is written without. For example, een van die unambiguously means “one of those”, so it is written without acute accents. However, een appel could mean both “one apple” and “an apple”, so if the former is intended one would write één appel.

When only the first letter of één is capitalised, the acute accent is usually dropped from the upper case E: Eén.

Examples
  • Een hoed: a hat; een oor; an ear.
  • Eén voor allen, allen voor één: one for all, all for one. (The motto of The Three Musketeers.)

Anagrams edit

Dutch Low Saxon edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

een m (indefinite article)

  1. (Achterhoeks, Drents, Sallands, Stellingwerfs, Twents, Urkers, Veluws) a, an

Etymology 2 edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

een

  1. (Achterhoeks, Drents, Sallands, Twents, Veluws) one (1)
    Een hoed: a hat; een ore; an ear.
    Eén veur allen, allen veur één: one for all, all for one. (The motto of The Three Musketeers.)

Further reading edit

Usage notes edit

  • When it is unclear from the context whether een is the number or the indefinite article, the former is written with acute accents: één. In all other cases it is written without. For example, een van die is 'one of those'. But een appel can mean both 'one apple' and 'an apple', so if the former is intended one would write één appel.

Finnish edit

Noun edit

een

  1. genitive singular of ee

Anagrams edit

German Low German edit

German Low German cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : een
    Ordinal : eerst

Alternative forms edit

  • (in other dialects, including Low Prussian) en
  • (in some dialects) ein
  • (East Pomeranian) ain
  • (for others, see en)

Article edit

een m or n

  1. (in some dialects, including Low Prussian) Alternative spelling of en : a, an

Numeral edit

een

  1. (in some dialects) Alternative spelling of en : one (1)

Coordinate terms edit

Hunsrik edit

Hunsrik numbers (edit)
10
 ←  0 1 2  →  10  → 
    Cardinal: een, enns
    Ordinal: eerst
    Adverbial: eenmol
    Fractional: ganz

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle High German ein, from Old High German ein, from Proto-West Germanic *ain, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.[1]

Cognate with German ein and Luxembourgish een.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

een

  1. one

Declension edit

References edit

  1. ^ Piter Kehoma Boll (2021) “een”, in Dicionário Hunsriqueano Riograndense–Português [Riograndenser Hunsrickisch–Portuguese Dictionary]‎[1] (in Portuguese), 3 edition, Ivoti: Riograndenser Hunsrickisch, page 40

Luxembourgish edit

Luxembourgish cardinal numbers
1 2  > 
    Cardinal : een

Etymology edit

From Middle High German ein, from Old High German ein, from Proto-West Germanic *ain, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

een

  1. (indefinite) one

Middle Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Old Dutch ēn, ein, from Proto-West Germanic *ain, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

êen

  1. a (indefinite article)
  2. a certain (before people's names)

Inflection edit

This article needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants edit

  • Dutch: een, 'n (/ən/)
  • Zealandic: 'n

Numeral edit

êen

  1. one

Inflection edit

This numeral needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants edit

  • Dutch: een (/eːn/)
  • Limburgish: ein
  • Zealandic: eên

Pronoun edit

êen

  1. one, someone, a certain person
    Synonym: iemen
  2. something
  3. one (indefinite)
    Synonym: men

Inflection edit

This pronoun needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading edit

North Frisian edit

North Frisian numbers (edit)
10
1 2  →  10  → 
    Cardinal: een, ian
    Ordinal: iarst

Etymology edit

From Old Frisian ēn.

Numeral edit

een (m.) (f. or n. ian)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) one

Coordinate terms edit

Old Frisian edit

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

een

  1. Late Old Frisian spelling of ēn

Article edit

een

  1. Late Old Frisian spelling of ēn

References edit

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Saterland Frisian edit

Etymology edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

een

  1. feminine of aan
  2. neuter of aan

Article edit

een

  1. feminine of aan
  2. neuter of aan

References edit

  • Marron C. Fort (2015) “een”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

Scots edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

een

  1. plural of ee

Etymology 2 edit

Numeral edit

een

  1. Doric, South Northern, and Shetland form of ane (one)

Yola edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English eend, from Old English ende, from Proto-West Germanic *andī.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

een

  1. end
    Synonym: endeen
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Ill een.
      Ill end.

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

een

  1. Alternative form of ieen (eyes)

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 37 & 38