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See also: Herra, herrá, and herrå

Contents

BasqueEdit

NounEdit

herra

  1. hatred

FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old Dutch hēriro, Old High German hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder). Cognates include Danish, Norwegian and Swedish herre, Icelandic herra, Dutch heer, German Herr. The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: her‧ra
  • Rhymes: -erːɑ
  • IPA(key): /ˈherːɑ/

NounEdit

herra

  1. mister, gentleman, sir (polite address)
    Anteeksi, herra ...
    Excuse me, sir ...
    Hyvät herrat!
    Gentlemen!
    Herra Virtanen, voinko puhua kanssanne?
    Mister Virtanen, may I speak with you?
  2. lord (person having formal authority over others)
  3. lord (person enjoying great respect in a community)
  4. lord, master (owner)
  5. capitalized (Herra), Lord (God)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of herra (Kotus type 9/kala, no gradation)
nominative herra herrat
genitive herran herrojen
partitive herraa herroja
illative herraan herroihin
singular plural
nominative herra herrat
accusative nom. herra herrat
gen. herran
genitive herran herrojen
herrainrare
partitive herraa herroja
inessive herrassa herroissa
elative herrasta herroista
illative herraan herroihin
adessive herralla herroilla
ablative herralta herroilta
allative herralle herroille
essive herrana herroina
translative herraksi herroiksi
instructive herroin
abessive herratta herroitta
comitative herroineen

Derived termsEdit

CompoundsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse herra, from Old Saxon hērro, from Old Dutch hēriro, Old High German hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder). Cognates include Danish, Norwegian and Swedish herre, Dutch heer, German Herr. The Old High German word originally meant “grey, grey-haired”, and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

herra m (genitive singular herra, nominative plural herrar)

  1. lord, master
  2. the Lord (God)
  3. an honorific title for a bishop; Lord
  4. an honorific title for a noble; Lord
  5. an honorific title for the highest state officials, now especially the president, but also a sýslumaður (the local official of the state in each sýsla), ambassador, etc.; Excellency
  6. mister (general honorific for a man, especially in writing; usually abbreviated: hr.)
  7. a general deferential form of address to a male; sir
  8. gentleman (general polite term for a male)
    dömur mínar og herrar
    Ladies and gentlemen.

Usage notesEdit

Used as an honorific title (prenominally or on its own) for bishops and for the president of Iceland (also, especially historically, for some other dignitaries). Also used as a general courtesy title for men, equivalent to English mister, but then primarily in formal written correspondence and abbreviated hr. However, when it is used as an honorific title for bishops, presidents, etc., it should never be abbreviated. The equivalent female title is frú (in both contexts).

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

herra (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative herraði, supine herrað)

  1. (transitive) to knight or bestow nobility on
  2. (transitive) to confer on someone the dignity of herra, allow someone to be called herra
  3. (transitive) to address or refer to as herra (as should be done to bishops, etc.)

ConjugationEdit


IngrianEdit

NounEdit

herra

  1. lord

Old NorseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon hērro, from Old Dutch hēriro, Old High German hērro, the comparative form of hēr (noble, venerable) (German hehr), by analogy with Latin senior (elder).[1] The Old High German word originally meant "grey, grey-haired", and descends from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey), making it cognate with Old English hār (English hoar), Old Norse hárr.

NounEdit

herra m

  1. mister, gentleman
  2. sir

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

herra

  1. (transitive) to confer with the title of "herra" upon a person

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • herra in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  1. ^ Falk, Hjalmar; Torp, Alf (1903–06) Etymologisk ordbog over det norske og det danske sprog [Etymological Dictionary of the Norwegian and Danish Languages], page 286