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TranslingualEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AbbreviationEdit

il

  1. (Internet) the Internet Top Level Domain code for Israel

NumeralEdit

il

  1. (informal) A Roman numeral representing forty-nine (49).

See alsoEdit


AzeriEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic ил
Roman il
Perso-Arabic

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *jɨl.

NounEdit

il (definite accusative ili, plural illər)

  1. year

DeclensionEdit


BunakEdit

NounEdit

il

  1. water

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

il c

  1. (rare) haste, speed

VerbEdit

il

  1. imperative of ile

FaroeseEdit

 
Iljar (soles).

NounEdit

il f (genitive singular iljar, plural iljar)

  1. the sole of the foot
f8 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative il ilin iljar iljarnar
Accusative il ilina iljar iljarnar
Dative il ilini iljum iljunum
Genitive iljar iljarinnar ilja iljanna



FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French il, from Old French il, from Vulgar Latin *illī, which is derived from Classical Latin ille.[1]

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

il (third-person singular, plural ils, accusative le, dative lui, emphatic lui)

  1. he (third-person singular masculine subject pronoun for human subject)
  2. it (third-person singular subject pronoun for grammarically masculine objects)
  3. Impersonal subject; it
    • Il pleut - It’s raining

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dauzat, Albert; Jean Dubois, Henri Mitterand (1964), chapter IL, in Nouveau dictionnaire étymologique (in French), Paris: Librairie Larousse

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

Friulian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine il
l'
i
feminine  la
l'
lis

EtymologyEdit

From Latin illum, ultimately from ille.

ArticleEdit

il m sg (plural i)

  1. the

See alsoEdit


IcelandicEdit

 
Iljar (soles).

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse il, from Proto-Germanic *iljō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

il f (genitive singular iljar, nominative plural iljar)

  1. the sole of the foot
    Honum sagðist vera illt í ilinni.
    He said his sole hurt.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

il (plural ili, possessive ilua, possessive plural ilui)

  1. Apocopic form of ilu; he, him

InterlinguaEdit

PronounEdit

il

  1. personal pronoun used with impersonal verbs
    Il ha multe arbores illac.
    There are many trees there.

Usage notesEdit

Optional.


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the older form lo, via an intermediate form l, from Latin illum, ultimately from ille. The initial i is a svarabhakti vowel added to the form l in order to make the pronunciation easier.[1]

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /il/

ArticleEdit

Italian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine il
lo
i
gli
feminine  la le

il m sg (plural i)

  1. the

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Patota, Giuseppe (2002) Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, ISBN 88-15-08638-2, pages 123, 124

AnagramsEdit


MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic اَل (al-).

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

il

  1. the

Usage notesEdit

  • Before the letters ċ, d, n, r, s, t, x, ż and z the l assimilates, resulting in the following forms:
  • This word (in all forms) connects to the following word with a hyphen
    il-mara (the woman)
    il-futur (the future)
    ix-xemx (the sun)
  • The initial i is dropped before and after vowels
    l-iben (the son)
    rajna l-film (we saw the film)
    tax-xemx (of the sun)

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French il.

PronounEdit

il m

  1. he
  2. it (impersonal, or referring to an unknown person)

DescendantsEdit

  • French: il

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *illī, from Latin ille.

PronounEdit

il

  1. he (third-person masculine singular subject pronoun)
  2. they (third-person masculine plural subject pronoun)
    • circa 1170, Wace, Le Roman de Rou:
      S'il vos poent ataindre, ja vos areient tué.
      If they could range you, they would have already killed you.

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle French: il
    • French: il

Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *pelh₁-; cognate with Gothic 𐍆𐌹𐌻𐌿 (filu, much), Ancient Greek πολύς (polús, much), Sanskrit पुरु (puru, much).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

il

  1. much, many (usually as the first member of a compound, usually governs a plural noun)
    cosin taidbse il – "with much ostentation"
    Is amlid do·rigéni Dia corp duini ó il-ballaib. – "Thus God has made man's body of many members."
    Is ferr precept oldaas labrad il-béelre. – "Preaching is better than speaking many languages."
    trissam mrechtrad inna n-il-briathar – "through the variation of the many words"

InflectionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
il unchanged n-il
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

il f

  1. the sole of the foot

DescendantsEdit

  • Icelandic: il
  • Faroese: il

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

il c

  1. (archaic) gust; a strong, abrupt rush of wind
  2. (archaic) hurry

DeclensionEdit

Declension of il 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative il ilen ilar ilarna
Genitive ils ilens ilars ilarnas

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

il

  1. province

SynonymsEdit


TzotzilEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

il

  1. (transitive) to see

ReferencesEdit