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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  • From Latin triviālis (appropriate to the street-corner, commonplace, vulgar), from trivium (place where three roads meet). Compare trivium, trivia.
  • From the distinction between trivium (the lower division of the liberal arts; grammar, logic and rhetoric) and quadrivium (the higher division of the seven liberal arts in the Middle Ages, composed of geometry, astronomy, arithmetic, and music).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɹɪ.vi.əl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

trivial (comparative more trivial, superlative most trivial)

  1. Ignorable; of little significance or value.
    • 1848, Thackeray, William Makepeace, Vanity Fair, Bantam Classics (1997), 16:
      "All which details, I have no doubt, Jones, who reads this book at his Club, will pronounce to be excessively foolish, trivial, twaddling, and ultra-sentimental."
  2. Commonplace, ordinary.
    • De Quincey
      As a scholar, meantime, he was trivial, and incapable of labour.
  3. Concerned with or involving trivia.
  4. (taxonomy) Relating to or designating the name of a species; specific as opposed to generic.
  5. (mathematics) Of, relating to, or being the simplest possible case.
  6. (mathematics) Self-evident.
  7. Pertaining to the trivium.
  8. (philosophy) Indistinguishable in case of truth or falsity.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

trivial (plural trivials)

  1. (obsolete) Any of the three liberal arts forming the trivium.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Skelton to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wood to this entry?)

ReferencesEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for trivial in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trivial (masculine and feminine plural trivials)

  1. trivial

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trivial (feminine singular triviale, masculine plural triviaux, feminine plural triviales)

  1. trivial (common, easy, obvious)
  2. ordinary, mundane
  3. colloquial (language)

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trivial m or f (plural triviais)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French trivial, from Latin triviālis (common).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trivial (comparative trivialer, superlative am trivialsten)

  1. trivial (common, easy, obvious)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


PiedmonteseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trivial

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trivial m or f (plural triviais, comparable)

  1. trivial

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • trivial in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French trivial.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trivial m or n (feminine singular trivială, masculine plural triviali, feminine and neuter plural triviale)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɾiˈbjal/, [t̪ɾiˈβjal]
  • Hyphenation: tri‧vial

AdjectiveEdit

trivial (plural triviales)

  1. trivial

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit