EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old English, from Late Latin manna, from Ancient Greek μάννα (mánna), from Hebrew מן(mān, 'manna).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

manna (uncountable)

  1. (biblical) Food miraculously produced for the Israelites in the desert in the book of Exodus.
    • Exodus 16:14-15, KJV:
      And when the dew that lay was gone up, behold, upon the face of the wilderness there lay a small round thing, as small as the hoar frost on the ground. And when the children of Israel saw it, they said one to another, It is manna: for they wist not what it was. And Moses said unto them, This is the bread which the LORD hath given you to eat.
  2. (by extension) Any boon which comes into one's hands by good luck.
    • 1596-99, Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act V, scene i:
      Fair ladies, you drop manna in the way / Of starved people.
    • 2010, Giancarlo Gandolfo, Economic Dynamics (4th ed.), Springer 2010, p. 197f.
      The introduction of technical progress in this model can be made in a very simple manner if we assume that it is of the ‘disembodied’ type, that is, something like manna that falls from heaven on all capital goods, old and new. [emphasis in original]
  3. The sugary sap of the manna gum tree which oozes out from holes drilled by insects and falls to the ground around the tree.[1]
    • 1966, Bill Beatty, Tales of Old Australia, National Distributors, →ISBN, page 14, discussing old Australian foods
      The icing on the cake was made from manna, which was gathered under the manna gums. Manna mixed with milk made a splendid icing.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin manna, from Ancient Greek μάννα (mánna), from Hebrew מן(mān, 'manna).

NounEdit

manna n (genitive singular manna, uncountable)

  1. manna
  2. (botany) fruit of an elm tree

DeclensionEdit

Declension of manna (singular only)
n1s singular
indefinite definite
nominative manna mannað
accusative manna mannað
dative manna mannanum
genitive manna mannans

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin manna, from Ancient Greek μάννα (mánna), from Hebrew מן(mān, 'manna).

NounEdit

manna

  1. (biblical) manna (food substance)
  2. manna (any good thing)
  3. semolina

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of manna (Kotus type 9/kala, no gradation)
nominative manna
genitive mannan
partitive mannaa
illative mannaan
singular plural
nominative manna
accusative nom. manna
gen. mannan
genitive mannan
partitive mannaa
inessive mannassa
elative mannasta
illative mannaan
adessive mannalla
ablative mannalta
allative mannalle
essive mannana
translative mannaksi
instructive
abessive mannatta
comitative
Possessive forms of manna (type kala)
possessor singular plural
1st person mannani mannamme
2nd person mannasi mannanne
3rd person mannansa

SynonymsEdit

  • (any good thing): nanna (especially food)

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

manna

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌰𐌽𐌽𐌰

GreenlandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

manna

  1. (demonstrative) proximal pronoun; this here, he/she/it here.

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit

  • una (that nearby)
  • innga (that yonder)
  • kanna (that down a medial distance)
  • sanna (that down a long distance)
  • pinnga (that up a medial distance)
  • panna (that up a long distance)
  • qanna (that in there/out there)
  • anna (that in the north)
  • kinnga (that in the south/that outside)

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

manna (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative mannaði, supine mannað)

  1. to man
ConjugationEdit

NounEdit

manna

  1. indefinite genitive plural of maður

Etymology 2Edit

Old Norse manna, from Late Latin manna.

NounEdit

manna n (genitive singular manna, no plural)

  1. manna
DeclensionEdit

IngrianEdit

NounEdit

manna

  1. groats

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin manna, from Ancient Greek μάννα (mánna), from Hebrew מן(mān, 'manna).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

manna f (plural manne)

  1. manna (all senses)

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


KavalanEdit

PronounEdit

manna

  1. (interrogative) why

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek μάννα (mánna), from Hebrew מן(man).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

manna f (genitive mannae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin) manna

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative manna mannae
Genitive mannae mannārum
Dative mannae mannīs
Accusative mannam mannās
Ablative mannā mannīs
Vocative manna mannae

ReferencesEdit

  • manna in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • manna in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek μάννα (mánna), from Hebrew מן(mān, 'manna).

NounEdit

manna m (definite singular mannaen, indefinite plural mannaer or mannaar, definite plural mannaene or mannaane)

  1. (biblical) manna
  2. a sweetish tree sap, especially of the manna ash
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From mann (man) +‎ -a.

Alternative formsEdit

  • manne (e- and split infinitives)

VerbEdit

manna (present tense mannar, past tense manna, past participle manna, passive infinitive mannast, present participle mannande, imperative mann)

  1. to man
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

manna

  1. genitive plural indefinite of maðr

SidamoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Cushitic. Cognates include Burji meena, Hadiyya manna and Kambaata manna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

manna m

  1. (collective) people

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Kazuhiro Kawachi (2007) A grammar of Sidaama (Sidamo), a Cushitic language of Ethiopia, page 38

Ter SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Samic *mānō.

NounEdit

manna

  1. moon
  2. month

Further readingEdit

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[2], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland