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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

mull +‎ -er

NounEdit

muller (plural mullers)

  1. One who, or that which, mulls.
  2. (art) A grinding stone, held in the hand, used especially for preparing paints and powders.
    • 1994, John Wilder Tukey, David R. Brillinger, The collected works of John W. Tukey[1], →ISBN, page 607:
      The muller provides, in addition, a useful means of comparing the important property of the rate of strength development of pigments.
  3. A vessel in which wine, etc., is mulled over a fire.

VerbEdit

muller (third-person singular simple present mullers, present participle mullering, simple past and past participle mullered)

  1. To grind up into, or as if into, powder.
    • 1848, On Lucifer Matches, in the Pharmaceutical Journal, volume 7 (1847-8), page 523:
      The mixing is conducted in a water-bath, and during this process, and as long as the phosphorus is being ground or 'mullered,' copious fumes are evolved.
    • 1901, Patrick Walker, Six Saints of the Covenant, volume 1, page 31:
      I have often thought in my melancholy days, these years bygone, that if it might be supposed, that the souls of our worthies were come from heaven, and the dust of their mullered bodies from their graves, and reunite again;

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

muller (plural mullers)

  1. (metallurgy) A machine that mixes sand and clay for use in metal castings.
    • 2008, Stephen Chastain, Build a Muller[2], →ISBN, page 93:
      The muller can easily plow through any sand mixture that I put in it and has plenty of power left over.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Unknown. The most prosaic theory derives it from muller1 (to grind into powder). One theory derives the term from the surname of the murderer Franz Müller,[1] while another theory derives it from the surname of German footballer Gerd Müller;[2] both are phonologically improbable. The Oxford Guide to Etymology →ISBN, 2009) asserts that it is "very probably of Romani origin, from a verb ultimately related to Sanskrit mṛ-' 'to die')."

VerbEdit

muller (third-person singular simple present mullers, present participle mullering, simple past and past participle mullered)

  1. (transitive, Britain, slang) To beat; to thrash (a person).
    • 2012, Anthony Cronshaw, Wednesday Rucks and Rock 'n' Roll: Tales from the East Bank
      The boys couldn't stand idly by while three Wednesdayites got mullered; it was not the done thing.
  2. (transitive, Britain, slang) To defeat or destroy utterly (as in a sport or competition).
    • 2006, Jez Butterworth, The Winterling[3], →ISBN, page 39:
      Sure enough, they've got mullered. They're yesterday's men. The sands of time have washed over them.
    • 2007, Stephen Cole, Thieves Like Us, page 220:
      Then there were these zombie cult people in the beds, wires and stuff shoved into them, and then Yianna had these two minders and they were the ones who mullered us in Cairo, I swear, and one of them grabbed Con [...]
    • 2009, Martina Cole, Close[4], →ISBN, page 374:
      "They mullered him, Jimmy." Spider shook his head. "He was completely destroyed."
QuotationsEdit
  • 1983, Tim Powers, The Anubis Gates, page 4:
    "No— beer was my Bessie's favorite drink, and since she mullered I've not had a drop of it."

ReferencesEdit

  • Wm. H. Peet, in Notes and Queries, page 337 (25 October 1902): The term "Muller," or "Muller-cut-down," applied to a hat, referred to an incident connected with the murder of Mr. Briggs in a railway carriage on 9 July, 1864. The murderer was Franz Müller, and [...] he was found with his victim's hat [...]. The hat had been specially made for Mr. Briggs, but Müller had had it cut down in a way that was common in the second-hand hat trade. For some years after a low hat was spoken of as a "Muller-cut-down," or a man was spoken of as having had his hat "mullered."
  1. ^ Cassell's Dictionary of Slang →ISBN, 2005), page 976
  2. ^ Dictionary of Contemporary Slang →ISBN, 2014), page 298

AragoneseEdit

 
Aragonese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia an

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mulier, mulierem.

NounEdit

muller f (plural mullers)

  1. woman
  2. wife

SynonymsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mulier, mulierem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

muller f (plural mullers)

  1. wife

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit


GalicianEdit

 
Unha muller ("a woman")

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese muller, moller, from Latin mulier, mulierem.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /muˈʎɛɾ/, /muˈɟɛɾ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

muller f (plural mulleres)

  1. woman
  2. wife

ReferencesEdit

  • muller” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • muller” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • muller” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • muller” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • muller” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Old PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

muller f

  1. Alternative form of moller